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Louisiana gumbo

We’re prepping to go back to school on the Homestyle podcast this week – Daily Advertiser

Welcome to Homestyle, a podcast from The Daily Advertiser that’s all about life, family and the stories they inspire. Two best friends — Leigh Guidry and Joe Cunningham — host, sharing their hobbies and ideas for family fun. 

It’s August, and although it’s not a normal August, it’s still back-to-school time. So Joe and Leigh talk about the challenges, the decisions and the lessons they’re learning as they prepare for the school year.

Episode 40: Going Back To School

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • how this year looks different for Joe, Leigh and their families
  • the decisions they’re making as parents and teachers and an education reporter and how they’re making them
  • what they’re worried about
  • what they hope we take from this experience

Listen to the full episode here:

We want to hear from you! Find us on Facebook and on Instagram (@Homestylepod). Leave us a review and be sure to rate our podcast on Apple Podcasts.

Catch up on more episodes of Homestyle below:

Episode 39: Coffee, Coffee, Coffee

We talked about one of our great loves: coffee. Whether it’s for cooking, crafting or, of course, drinking, coffee sure has its perks.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • plenty of craft ideas for kids and adults using coffee and coffee filters
  • how you can incorporate this blessed drink into recipes
  • how we take our coffee
  • why we love this drink so much

Episode 38: The Great Homestyle Baking Show

We enjoyed discussing baking as a pasttime that’s allowing us to be creative and taste some old favorites at the same time. In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe’s favorite recipes, including some oldies and new ones to try;
  • their different styles of baking and where they got them;
  • what baking means to them;
  • how it can be helpful today.

Episode 37: QuaranSTREAM

Remember that episode where we talked about reading our way through quarantine? This week we’re going over what we’re bingeing on all the streaming services available and all the time still spent at home.

On this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe’s favorite streaming services and their current guilty pleasures — from “Hamilton” to “Hell’s Kitchen” to “Fuller House;”
  • what our current faves mean to us during this time;
  • how to set boundaries and keep yourself from going overboard with the bingeing;
  • how to not be overwhelmed by all the options out there.

Episode 36: Embroidery

On this episode you’ll hear:

  • Hope Aucoin talks with us about how she discovered embroidery and how it quickly became her thing
  • how embroidery has impacted her before and during COVID-19
  • what to do to get started stitching

Episode 35: Get Your Game On

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Breaking news reporter Ashley White tells us about how she first started gaming and what’s the hobby has meant to her
  • what games she’s loving right now and some of her all-time favorites
  • and gaming experiences from Joe and Leigh

Episode 34: On Vacation

Leigh and Joe share their recent experiences on two very different vacations and why they were much-needed and a little different because of COVID-19. In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Our hosts talk about different kinds of vacations. Leigh just got back from a week in the Rocky Mountains with her kids and in-laws. Joe and his wife went on a sans-kids vacay with Joe’s family.
  • They talk about why they really needed these trips right now and what it meant to their families.
  • They share about how COVID-19 restriction impacted (or didn’t) their travel plans.
  • And they share where they want to go next.

Episode 33: Ups and Downs of Reopening

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe share what “reopening” has looked like for their families.
  • They get in to ups and downs of the last few months, especially Leigh. This week was a struggle.
  • They talk about tips to make it better going forward into a “new normal.”
  • Leigh’s husband Eric makes an appearance for the first time and talks about returning to basketball practice.

Episode 32: Barbers, Butchers and Relationships

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • As Louisiana begins to reopen and we’re allowed to head back to hairstylists and such, Leigh and Joe talk about the power of relationships
  • how coronavirus and quarantine might have emphasized the importance of relationships within our community
  • how we can remember that even after this has passed

Episode 31: The Urban Naturalist on Gardening

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Marcus explains his gardening philosophy — why he wants to create ecosystems and chooses edible and native plants
  • how he got in to agriculture and how that journey evolved into his job today
  • what you can do to incorporate low-key gardening into your life right now
  • Find out more about Marcus and The Urban Naturalist at 

theurbannaturalists.com, on Facebook or on Instagram @urban_naturalist.

Episode 30: The Year (and Your Goals) So Far

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe talk about the power words and goals they set way back in Episode 8
  • how coronavirus and quarantine have impacted those goals
  • what they’re gaining from this time at home
  • how they plan to move forward for the next six months of 2020

Episode 29: Art As An Outlet

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • where JP got his love of art and how it has been his outlet, something that’s coming in clutch during quarantine
  • what it’s like to pursue art as a hobby and how you can, too
  • the supplies you might want to grab to get started

Follow JP’s art journey on Instagram at @jp_fonte.

Episode 28: A Life of Art

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Hannah walks us through her art journey, from trying things as a kid, studying print-making and visual arts at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and now working as an artist full time
  • the different tools and tech she uses when creating
  • how COVID-19 has impacted her work and how she’s responding to changes
  • what’s next for the Louisiana-based artist
  • how art can be a lifestyle and therapeutic way to express yourself

Find more about her at her website hannahgumbo.com and on Instagram @allthatglittersisgumbo.

Episode 27: Nutrition During Quarantine

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • LSU AgCenter dietitian Mandy Armentor gives us ideas for healthy, simple meals we can make at home for the family;
  • shares LSU AgCenter resources for virtual recess, quarantine snacking tips and more;
  • gives tips about how to sneak veggies into meals for our picky eaters;
  • reminds us to get back to basics like the five food groups when it comes to cooking and meal planning;
  • and encourages us to give ourselves some grace during this time

Episode 26: Let’s Talk Distance Learning

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe talk about what they’re seeing in Louisiana and Acadiana schools and teachers do to provide learning opportunities
  • resources you can access online and for free (or very close to free) for your students
  • tips for how long to have students work each day — Don’t try to recreate a full day in a classroom on the computer, Joe says

Episode 25: Connecting Through Social Distancing

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • why it’s especially important to find ways to connect while maintaining distance
  • ideas like virtual happy hours, writing letters and phone calls
  • places you can go while still social distancing 
  • how to find an online community to connect with

Episode 24: Let’s Decorate Cookies

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Caitlin tells us how and why she got in to cookie decorating
  • her favorite techniques to try
  • how and why you can try while at home
  • the tools you’ll need to get started

Episode 23: What to Read in Your Downtime

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what Leigh and Joe are currently reading and their all-time favorites
  • why kids should be reading while schools are closed and how you can get them to do it
  • ways to incorporate reading into your day while in quarantine

Episode 22: In the Garden

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • how gardening can be a great outlet during this time of stay-at-home orders and COVID-19
  • tips from Joe for beginner gardenerers (i.e. Leigh)
  • a glimpse into Joe’s flower bed and roses
  • how to get kids involved in this project and keep them engaged

Episode 21: Capturing Memories with Photos

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Daily Advertiser photographer Scott Clause gives tips for organizing your photos and using them in your home;
  • he talks about the difference between photo art and photojournalism;
  • he provides some resources for printing photos for free or storing them.

Episode 20: Keep A Schedule During Quarantine

It’s week two of state mandates to close schools and work from home due to COVID-19, and between our two families we have three teachers and four kids. So this week we talk about the importance of finding and keeping a schedule for school and family activities.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Joe pull from his teaching experience to explain why it’s best to keep a schedule and routine while staying home for an extended time;
  • a few ideas for schedules, where to find more and how to tweak them to make it work for your family;
  • some activities to incorporate;
  • and advice to stay flexible.

Episode 19: Suddenly at Home for a Bit

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • a recipe to try out while you’re stuck at home;
  • a craft to get the kids involved and doing hands-on activities;
  • and ideas to keep from going stir crazy, from exercise to reading to educational programs.

Episode 18: Express Yourself

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • what having a creative outlet means to Leigh, Joe and Christa and what it does for Christa’s students
  • how she helps her students develop that writing skill and how you can, too
  • what you can do besides write to express yourself and get creative every day

Episode 17: What Lent Means to You

Mardi Gras is over, and we’re well into the Lenten season. So this week Leigh and Joe share what Lent means to them and what they like to eat. Joe helps out in that arena with some Lent-friendly recipes. 

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • how Joe makes an incredible crawfish cornbread (and how you can, too)
  • the practice of Lent in south Louisiana
  • ideas and different ways to observe the Lenten season

Episode 16: So Many Beads

It is finally Fat Tuesday, and you’ll be getting loaded down with beads, cups and other throws. Crafting is a fun, creative way to recycle all the things you’ve caught at the parades, so Leigh walks you through several ideas, from wreaths to headbands.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • how to create a wreath out of Mardi Gras beads and throws;
  • ways to decorate your table or garden with beads;
  • when you can use beads to celebrate other holidays.

Episode 15: The Struggle of the Juggle

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what juggling all the things looks like in Leigh’s and Joe’s lives (i.e. why they’re so tired at this point of basketball season)
  • how to find time to still do things you love that don’t make any money and why that matters
  • tips for winding down with family or asking for help when the struggle is too real

Episode 14: DIY Your Home and Save Energy

Joe and Leigh talk with Garrison Harrison, a conservation specialist with Lafayette Utilities System, about things people can do themselves to make sure they’re saving energy and saving money at home.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Garrison talk about the craziest things and biggest problems he’s seen providing “energy audits” at homes;
  • specific tips to put into place around the house to save energy and money;
  • and why Garrison chose this career.

For more about him and his job, visit lus.org or @lusutilities on Instagram. 

Episode 13: All Things Mardi Gras

We continue the Louisiana theme this week to discuss Mardi Gras with a special guest. Victoria Dodge is the features and culture reporter at The Daily Advertiser, but right now her unofficial title is Mardi Gras reporter.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what Victoria has been doing and learning as a non-Louisiana native experiencing her second Mardi Gras ever
  • Leigh and Joe throw in their experiences from north and south Louisiana
  • and some history of Lafayette Mardi Gras and the events you can find here this season

Episode 12: King Cake Season

It’s that great time of year (Epiphany) when we get to eat all the King Cake. Leigh and Joe already have had a few, so they share their favorites kind — more like a donut or cinnamon roll? Filled or not? Icing or sprinkles? Sweet or savory? So. Many. Choices.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe discuss the struggle of living in Louisiana during King Cake season and trying to keep New Year’s resolutions
  • their favorite kinds and places to get great King Cake
  • what a King Cake is (for those of you not in Louisiana) and its traditions
  • King Cake-flavored items you can try (Joe has strong feelings about this.)

Episode 11: Smokin’

Joe talks about smoking meat, something Leigh knows very little about so we all get to learn together!

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • which kinds of meat are best to smoke
  • different kinds of wood chips to use to impact flavor
  • ideas for rubs, marinades and sauces

Episode 10: Hosting Parties

Leigh and Joe — and special guest 7-year-old Elizabeth Cunningham — are talking about the favorite parties they’ve thrown and how they made it happen. From princess and Elmo birthday parties over the year to wedding showers this spring, they’ve got plenty of experience to share.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for choosing and carrying out a theme (without breaking the bank)
  • Leigh, Joe and Elizabeth’s favorite parties
  • destination party ideas
  • how to focus on the important part (having fun with friends and family) instead of on making the perfect party

Episode 9: Make the Most of the Weekend

Leigh and Joe are talking about activities families can do to together to make the most of the weekend.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Joe and family like to go to a bookstore like Barnes & Noble, which has story time for kids, coffee shop and lots to check out.
  • ideas for exploring your own town or the one you’re visiting (Joe loves grabbing a burger at Billy’s whenever he visits family in Natchitoches.)
  • Leigh and her family like road trips and getting outdoors. Maybe a day trip to a Louisiana state park or camping overnight.
  • ideas to make it a weekend at home. Encourage the kids to play with the toys they already have (you can hear the parent in us, can’t you?), do a craft or read a book.
  • tips for monitoring screen time for kids

Episode 8: Embracing a New Year

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • family traditions like camping as a way to start the new year calmly and around those you love;
  • traditional foods said to bring good luck and wealth in the new year;
  • a recipe for ham and beans to check pork (progress) and beans (wealth) off your list;
  • how to use make your own vision board;
  • how a “power word” can help you stay focused this year

Episode 7: Family Movie Night

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for at-home movie night food — like popcorn (obviously), a trail mix bar and banana cookies
  • light dinner ideas to make everyone happy and stay awake for the whole movie
  • the introduction of “grownup drinks” to movie theaters

Episode 6: Christmas Activities

It’s almost Christmas Day, so Joe and Leigh are talking about what to do during the holiday season.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for handling multiple Christmases in one day or one week
  • places you can go in Acadiana and across Louisiana to enjoy Christmas lights
  • how to get folks off their phones while home for the holidays
  • Leigh’s daughter Avery, 5, give some opinions in the background (sorry, not sorry)

Episode 5: Christmas Gifts

‘Tis the season for giving, so Joe and Leigh are talking about how they give during the holiday season. Sometimes it’s online or Black Friday shopping (yikes), or they have some ideas for how to make your own presents with a personal touch.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • gift ideas for those hard-to-buy-for folks in your circle
  • do-it-yourself options to personalize your giving
  • their favorite gifts as kids

Episode 4: Gumbo Time

It’s cool right now in Louisiana (at least some days), which means it’s gumbo time. In this episode you’ll hear:

  • a great gumbo recipe (Do you know the three-beer rule?)
  • Leigh and Joe’s many opinions about roux, potato salad and whether tomatoes belong in gumbo (Hint: they don’t)
  • their family gumbo traditions and favorite restaurant gumbos

Episode 3: Happy Thanksgiving

Our official launch episode is all about Thanksgiving, so Leigh and Joe talk about what their families do for their favorite holiday.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • recipe ideas for our favorite Thanksgiving pies — sweet potato and chocolate
  • craft ideas that you can modify for kids of different ages — painting with broccoli, anyone?
  • our family’s favorite activities — football and Taboo can get pretty competitive

Episode 2: Halloween

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe discuss their favorite childhood Halloween costumes;
  • DIY versus store-bought costumes,
  • how they trick-or-treat with their families;
  • and whether adults should dress up for the holiday

Episode 1: Tailgating

In the first episode, we discussed tailgating and gatherings to watch the big game — even if that’s at home in the air conditioning. (This is Louisiana after all.)

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • recipes for great tailgating food like chili (Are you pro-beans or anti-beans?), buffalo chicken dip and dessert;
  • tips for getting your house ready for the party;
  • and how to get the kids involved
Categories
Louisiana gumbo

What’s Eaten Where: New Orleans – Cyprus Mail

One of the most vibrant cities on the planet, New Orleans is a melting pot of cultures and cuisines, a place that’s known as the ‘Big Easy’ for its chilled out vibe and easy-going lifestyle. On the surface it’s a party town, known for its wildly exciting music scene and thrilling Mardi Gras celebrations.

But there’s a darker side to Louisiana’s city of the south. This was once the home of the voodoo queens and a magnet for voodoo ceremonies amongst the slaves. Even today, many of the houses in the old French Quarter claim to be haunted, and ‘ghost tours’ abound.

The food, however, IS a wonder. New Orleans is the home of Creole and Cajun cuisine, and the best place to find a spot of soul food. Set right on the Mississippi River Delta, the seafood here is miraculous: oysters Rockefeller (oysters on the half-shell topped with parsley and herbs, smothered in a rich butter sauce and bread crumbs, and then baked or broiled) and oysters Bienville (filled, baked oysters with added shrimp, mushrooms, bell peppers, sherry, and Parmesan) were both invented here.

But it’s gumbo that’s the defining dish of Orleanian cuisine. A thick soup which combines ingredients and culinary practices from several cultures – including African, French, Spanish, German, and Choctaw – gumbo is the local must-try.

Usually thickened with either okra or filé powder (dried and ground sassafras leaves), and made with what’s locally known as the Holy Trinity of vegetables (celery, bell peppers, and onions), this delicious soup comes in endless varieties, including Creole gumbo (usually containing shellfish, tomatoes, and sausage), Cajun gumbo (made with shellfish or fowl), or gumbo z’herbes (a meat-free blend of slow-cooked greens). Magnificently mysterious, gumbo is the perfect metaphor for New Orleans – a true melting pot of delicious decadence!

Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Where Y’Eat: Takeout to Carry on a Long Tradition at Brigtsen’s – WWNO

The menu at Brigtsen’s Restaurant has always told stories. Between the brown butter, bright remoulade and smoky gumbo you can read the heritage of Louisiana food, the evolution of the modern New Orleans restaurant and friendships reaching back generations. Right now, the menu at Brigtsen‘s also tells a story of our times, all packed for takeout.

Restaurants everywhere are adapting and even transforming themselves in a bid for survival through the coronavirus crisis. On the line are the future of their businesses, jobs for their staff and the roles these places have always played in their communities.
Brigtsen’s is showing one way. Marna and Frank Brigtsen first opened this Riverbend bistro in 1986. They shut it down for four months as the pandemic arrived.
They assumed the restaurant would stay shuttered until the state’s Phase 3 reopening process. Instead, the lengthening crisis forced their hand, like so many others. People need jobs back. Suppliers need business. Chefs need to cook.
Getting back open on terms they can accept means converting a homey cottage restaurant into an efficient takeout operation, since takeout is a safer route for service.
Places like Brigtsen’s have weathered daunting challenges through the years, and networks of friends and supporters and business partners have always been part of their longevity. The coronavirus crisis is testing the durability of those networks in new ways.
Carrying on with takeout means fielding phone orders and shuttling cartons of redfish and shrimp calas to the car line outside. It means packing gumbo and butternut shrimp bisque by the quart and bundling whole pies.
Before reopening, Frank Brigtsen rigged up his restaurant with new plastic dividers as a staff safety measure. He also went to the pet store and bought a blue aquarium net, a handy, if goofy, tool to collect credit cards while keeping a distance.
Even in hard times, the chef hasn’t lost his sense of humor. Nor, gratefully, his sense of purpose.

Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Cary Morin hits the sweet spot with Dockside Saints – Toledo Blade


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Louisiana gumbo

Take a coffee break with the Homestyle podcast. Catch up on episodes here – Daily Advertiser

Welcome to Homestyle, a podcast from The Daily Advertiser that’s all about life, family and the stories they inspire. Two best friends — Leigh Guidry and Joe Cunningham — host, sharing their hobbies and ideas for family fun. 

This week we talked about one of our great loves: coffee. Whether it’s for cooking, crafting or, of course, drinking, coffee sure has its perks.

Episode 39: Coffee, Coffee, Coffee

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • plenty of craft ideas for kids and adults using coffee and coffee filters
  • how you can incorporate this blessed drink into recipes
  • how we take our coffee
  • why we love this drink so much

Listen to the full episode here:

We want to hear from you! Find us on Facebook and on Instagram (@Homestylepod). Leave us a review and be sure to rate our podcast on Apple Podcasts.

Catch up on more episodes of Homestyle below:

Episode 38: The Great Homestyle Baking Show

We enjoyed discussing baking as a pasttime that’s allowing us to be creative and taste some old favorites at the same time. In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe’s favorite recipes, including some oldies and new ones to try;
  • their different styles of baking and where they got them;
  • what baking means to them;
  • how it can be helpful today.

Episode 37: QuaranSTREAM

Remember that episode where we talked about reading our way through quarantine? This week we’re going over what we’re bingeing on all the streaming services available and all the time still spent at home.

On this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe’s favorite streaming services and their current guilty pleasures — from “Hamilton” to “Hell’s Kitchen” to “Fuller House;”
  • what our current faves mean to us during this time;
  • how to set boundaries and keep yourself from going overboard with the bingeing;
  • how to not be overwhelmed by all the options out there.

Episode 36: Embroidery

On this episode you’ll hear:

  • Hope Aucoin talks with us about how she discovered embroidery and how it quickly became her thing
  • how embroidery has impacted her before and during COVID-19
  • what to do to get started stitching

Episode 35: Get Your Game On

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Breaking news reporter Ashley White tells us about how she first started gaming and what’s the hobby has meant to her
  • what games she’s loving right now and some of her all-time favorites
  • and gaming experiences from Joe and Leigh

Episode 34: On Vacation

  • Leigh and Joe share their recent experiences on two very different vacations and why they were much-needed and a little different because of COVID-19. In this episode you’ll hear:
  • Our hosts talk about different kinds of vacations. Leigh just got back from a week in the Rocky Mountains with her kids and in-laws. Joe and his wife went on a sans-kids vacay with Joe’s family.
  • They talk about why they really needed these trips right now and what it meant to their families.
  • They share about how COVID-19 restriction impacted (or didn’t) their travel plans.
  • And they share where they want to go next.

Episode 33: Ups and Downs of Reopening

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe share what “reopening” has looked like for their families.
  • They get in to ups and downs of the last few months, especially Leigh. This week was a struggle.
  • They talk about tips to make it better going forward into a “new normal.”
  • Leigh’s husband Eric makes an appearance for the first time and talks about returning to basketball practice.

Episode 32: Barbers, Butchers and Relationships

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • As Louisiana begins to reopen and we’re allowed to head back to hairstylists and such, Leigh and Joe talk about the power of relationships
  • how coronavirus and quarantine might have emphasized the importance of relationships within our community
  • how we can remember that even after this has passed

Episode 31: The Urban Naturalist on Gardening

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • The Urban Naturalist owner Marcus Descant explains his gardening philosophy — why he wants to create ecosystems and chooses edible and native plants
  • how he got in to agriculture and how that journey evolved into his job today
  • what you can do to incorporate low-key gardening into your life right now

Find out more about Marcus and The Urban Naturalist at theurbannaturalists.com, on Facebook or on Instagram @urban_naturalist.

Episode 30: The Year (and Your Goals) So Far

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe talk about the power words and goals they set way back in Episode 8
  • how coronavirus and quarantine have impacted those goals
  • what they’re gaining from this time at home
  • how they plan to move forward for the next six months of 2020

Episode 29: Art As An Outlet

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Daily Advertiser producer J.P. Fonte talks about where he got his love of art and how it has been his outlet, something that’s coming in clutch during quarantine
  • what it’s like to pursue art as a hobby and how you can, too
  • the supplies you might want to grab to get started

Follow JP’s art journey on Instagram at @jp_fonte.

Episode 28: A Life of Art

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Local artist Hannah Thibodeaux, known as Hannah Gumbo in the art world, walks us through her art journey, from trying things as a kid, studying print-making and visual arts at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and now working as an artist full time
  • the different tools and tech she uses when creating
  • how COVID-19 has impacted her work and how she’s responding to changes
  • what’s next for the Louisiana-based artist
  • how art can be a lifestyle and therapeutic way to express yourself

Find more about her at her website hannahgumbo.com and on Instagram @allthatglittersisgumbo.

Episode 27: Nutrition During Quarantine

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • LSU AgCenter dietitian Mandy Armentor gives us ideas for healthy, simple meals we can make at home for the family;
  • shares LSU AgCenter resources for virtual recess, quarantine snacking tips and more;
  • gives tips about how to sneak veggies into meals for our picky eaters;
  • reminds us to get back to basics like the five food groups when it comes to cooking and meal planning;
  • and encourages us to give ourselves some grace during this time

Episode 26: Let’s Talk Distance Learning

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe talk about what they’re seeing in Louisiana and Acadiana schools and teachers do to provide learning opportunities
  • resources you can access online and for free (or very close to free) for your students
  • tips for how long to have students work each day — Don’t try to recreate a full day in a classroom on the computer, Joe says

Episode 25: Connecting Through Social Distancing

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • why it’s especially important to find ways to connect while maintaining distance
  • ideas like virtual happy hours, writing letters and phone calls
  • places you can go while still social distancing 
  • how to find an online community to connect 

Episode 24: Let’s Decorate Cookies

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Caitlin tells us how and why she got in to cookie decorating
  • her favorite techniques to try
  • how and why you can try while at home
  • the tools you’ll need to get started

Episode 23: What to Read in Your Downtime

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what Leigh and Joe are currently reading and their all-time favorites
  • why kids should be reading while schools are closed and how you can get them to do it
  • ways to incorporate reading into your day while in quarantine

Episode 22: In the Garden

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • how gardening can be a great outlet during this time of stay-at-home orders and COVID-19
  • tips from Joe for beginner gardenerers (i.e. Leigh)
  • a glimpse into Joe’s flower bed and roses
  • how to get kids involved in this project and keep them engaged

Episode 21: Capturing Memories with Photos

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Daily Advertiser photographer Scott Clause gives tips for organizing your photos and using them in your home;
  • he talks about the difference between photo art and photojournalism;
  • he provides some resources for printing photos for free or storing them.

Episode 20: Keep A Schedule During Quarantine

It’s week two of state mandates to close schools and work from home due to COVID-19, and between our two families we have three teachers and four kids. So this week we talk about the importance of finding and keeping a schedule for school and family activities.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Joe pull from his teaching experience to explain why it’s best to keep a schedule and routine while staying home for an extended time;
  • a few ideas for schedules, where to find more and how to tweak them to make it work for your family;
  • some activities to incorporate;
  • and advice to stay flexible.

Episode 19: Suddenly at Home for a Bit

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • a recipe to try out while you’re stuck at home;
  • a craft to get the kids involved and doing hands-on activities;
  • and ideas to keep from going stir crazy, from exercise to reading to educational programs.

Episode 18: Express Yourself

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • what having a creative outlet means to Leigh, Joe and Christa and what it does for Christa’s students
  • how she helps her students develop that writing skill and how you can, too
  • what you can do besides write to express yourself and get creative every day

Episode 17: What Lent Means to You

Mardi Gras is over, and we’re well into the Lenten season. So this week Leigh and Joe share what Lent means to them and what they like to eat. Joe helps out in that arena with some Lent-friendly recipes. 

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • how Joe makes an incredible crawfish cornbread (and how you can, too)
  • the practice of Lent in south Louisiana
  • ideas and different ways to observe the Lenten season

Episode 16: So Many Beads

It is finally Fat Tuesday, and you’ll be getting loaded down with beads, cups and other throws. Crafting is a fun, creative way to recycle all the things you’ve caught at the parades, so Leigh walks you through several ideas, from wreaths to headbands.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • how to create a wreath out of Mardi Gras beads and throws;
  • ways to decorate your table or garden with beads;
  • when you can use beads to celebrate other holidays.

Episode 15: The Struggle of the Juggle

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what juggling all the things looks like in Leigh’s and Joe’s lives (i.e. why they’re so tired at this point of basketball season)
  • how to find time to still do things you love that don’t make any money and why that matters
  • tips for winding down with family or asking for help when the struggle is too real

Episode 14: DIY Your Home and Save Energy

Joe and Leigh talk with Garrison Harrison, a conservation specialist with Lafayette Utilities System, about things people can do themselves to make sure they’re saving energy and saving money at home.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Garrison talk about the craziest things and biggest problems he’s seen providing “energy audits” at homes;
  • specific tips to put into place around the house to save energy and money;
  • and why Garrison chose this career.

For more about him and his job, visit lus.org or @lusutilities on Instagram. 

Episode 13: All Things Mardi Gras

We continue the Louisiana theme this week to discuss Mardi Gras with a special guest. Victoria Dodge is the features and culture reporter at The Daily Advertiser, but right now her unofficial title is Mardi Gras reporter.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what Victoria has been doing and learning as a non-Louisiana native experiencing her second Mardi Gras ever
  • Leigh and Joe throw in their experiences from north and south Louisiana
  • and some history of Lafayette Mardi Gras and the events you can find here this season

Episode 12: King Cake Season

It’s that great time of year (Epiphany) when we get to eat all the King Cake. Leigh and Joe already have had a few, so they share their favorites kind — more like a donut or cinnamon roll? Filled or not? Icing or sprinkles? Sweet or savory? So. Many. Choices.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe discuss the struggle of living in Louisiana during King Cake season and trying to keep New Year’s resolutions
  • their favorite kinds and places to get great King Cake
  • what a King Cake is (for those of you not in Louisiana) and its traditions
  • King Cake-flavored items you can try (Joe has strong feelings about this.)

Episode 11: Smokin’

Joe talks about smoking meat, something Leigh knows very little about so we all get to learn together!

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • which kinds of meat are best to smoke
  • different kinds of wood chips to use to impact flavor
  • ideas for rubs, marinades and sauces

Episode 10: Hosting Parties

Leigh and Joe — and special guest 7-year-old Elizabeth Cunningham — are talking about the favorite parties they’ve thrown and how they made it happen. From princess and Elmo birthday parties over the year to wedding showers this spring, they’ve got plenty of experience to share.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for choosing and carrying out a theme (without breaking the bank)
  • Leigh, Joe and Elizabeth’s favorite parties
  • destination party ideas
  • how to focus on the important part (having fun with friends and family) instead of on making the perfect party

Episode 9: Make the Most of the Weekend

Leigh and Joe are talking about activities families can do to together to make the most of the weekend.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Joe and family like to go to a bookstore like Barnes & Noble, which has story time for kids, coffee shop and lots to check out.
  • ideas for exploring your own town or the one you’re visiting (Joe loves grabbing a burger at Billy’s whenever he visits family in Natchitoches.)
  • Leigh and her family like road trips and getting outdoors. Maybe a day trip to a Louisiana state park or camping overnight.
  • ideas to make it a weekend at home. Encourage the kids to play with the toys they already have (you can hear the parent in us, can’t you?), do a craft or read a book.
  • tips for monitoring screen time for kids

Episode 8: Embracing a New Year

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • family traditions like camping as a way to start the new year calmly and around those you love;
  • traditional foods said to bring good luck and wealth in the new year;
  • a recipe for ham and beans to check pork (progress) and beans (wealth) off your list;
  • how to use make your own vision board;
  • how a “power word” can help you stay focused this year

Episode 7: Family Movie Night

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for at-home movie night food — like popcorn (obviously), a trail mix bar and banana cookies
  • light dinner ideas to make everyone happy and stay awake for the whole movie
  • the introduction of “grownup drinks” to movie theaters

Episode 6: Christmas Activities

It’s almost Christmas Day, so Joe and Leigh are talking about what to do during the holiday season.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for handling multiple Christmases in one day or one week
  • places you can go in Acadiana and across Louisiana to enjoy Christmas lights
  • how to get folks off their phones while home for the holidays
  • Leigh’s daughter Avery, 5, give some opinions in the background (sorry, not sorry)

Episode 5: Christmas Gifts

‘Tis the season for giving, so Joe and Leigh are talking about how they give during the holiday season. Sometimes it’s online or Black Friday shopping (yikes), or they have some ideas for how to make your own presents with a personal touch.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • gift ideas for those hard-to-buy-for folks in your circle
  • do-it-yourself options to personalize your giving
  • their favorite gifts as kids

Episode 4: Gumbo Time

It’s cool right now in Louisiana (at least some days), which means it’s gumbo time. In this episode you’ll hear:

  • a great gumbo recipe (Do you know the three-beer rule?)
  • Leigh and Joe’s many opinions about roux, potato salad and whether tomatoes belong in gumbo (Hint: they don’t)
  • their family gumbo traditions and favorite restaurant gumbos

Episode 3: Happy Thanksgiving

Our official launch episode is all about Thanksgiving, so Leigh and Joe talk about what their families do for their favorite holiday.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • recipe ideas for our favorite Thanksgiving pies — sweet potato and chocolate
  • craft ideas that you can modify for kids of different ages — painting with broccoli, anyone?
  • our family’s favorite activities — football and Taboo can get pretty competitive

Episode 2: Halloween

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe discuss their favorite childhood Halloween costumes;
  • DIY versus store-bought costumes,
  • how they trick-or-treat with their families;
  • and whether adults should dress up for the holiday

Episode 1: Tailgating

In the first episode, we discussed tailgating and gatherings to watch the big game — even if that’s at home in the air conditioning. (This is Louisiana after all.)

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • recipes for great tailgating food like chili (Are you pro-beans or anti-beans?), buffalo chicken dip and dessert;
  • tips for getting your house ready for the party;
  • and how to get the kids involved
Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Facebook Food Groups Are Being Reinvigorated by Home Chefs and Bakers – Thrillist

Food & Drink

Facebook groups have lent themselves as a place for chefs and bakers to pursue entrepreneurialism, especially during the pandemic.

beurre food co basque cheesecake facebook groups seller

beurre food co basque cheesecake facebook groups seller

Photo: Beurre Food Co.; Illustration: Thrillist/Maitane Romagosa

I don’t really go on Facebook anymore. My timeline is riddled with announcements of former friends having kids or barely-acquaintances making sweeping statements about politics — not to mention the abundance of misinformation spread on the platform and the tolerance for hate speech. I find the website no longer provides anything of use for me, save for one thing: Facebook groups. There are Facebook groups devoted to anything and everything: crocheting, judging questionable wedding decisions à la Reddit, practicing French, and of course, food. 

I first became aware of the thriving world of Facebook’s food groups after returning home to Los Angeles (specifically the San Gabriel Valley) following months of dystopian horror spent in New York throughout the peak of the pandemic. At home, I was invited to the Facebook group SGV Eats by a friend — a group of over 17,000 people — all of whom share insights on the best place to grab xiaolongbao; where to buy take-out Japanese curry after the closure of legendary curry chain, Curry House; and which Korean barbecue restaurants offer outdoor seating within the greater San Gabriel Valley area. Among the food reviewers, of which there are thousands, are home bakers and chefs selling their own concoctions. 

There’s spicy jars of homemade chili oil available for preorder, fresh-baked buns stuffed with garlicky cream cheese, and tubs of gumbo made from a grandmother’s recipe thousands of miles away from its Lettsworth, Louisiana origins. “You can’t get this here,” Kimberly Harper Velazco, who sells the gumbo on SGV Eats under her business called Alice’s Southern Comfort, told me over a recent video call. “Even in your more famous and popular seafood or Creole restaurants in LA county, it’s good — but because they’ve become these large restaurants, it’s still not that grandma-in-the-back putting that heart, soul, and love into it. That’s what I do.” 

Though Velazco was born in California, she made trips every summer to Louisiana to spend time with her grandma Alice and cousins there. The food and the shenanigans she would get into were always memorable. “Her gumbo was just something that became this community thing. I was always right next to her hip when I was a little kid. I just stayed in the kitchen and watched her do her thing.” 

When Grandma Alice passed this past November, Velazco felt it was right to continue her legacy of sharing food imbued with love and started the business honoring her grandmother’s name in January. “The [South] is like home to me, and I want to bring as much of that to sunny Socal as I can.” But when Covid-19 hit, Velazco’s catering plans were put on hold. Instead, she took to Facebook to get the word out about her gumbo simmered with blue crab and other Southern favorites she provides: black eyed peas, baked mac and cheese, and lemony buttermilk cake. The response, support, and cultural exchange that followed is something that Velazco “never would have thought [she’d] find in a million years.”

Tracy Phuong, another member of the SGV Eats group, has also turned her side hobby of baking into a small business selling Basque cheesecakes with Asian flair under the name Beurre Food Co. “I’ve always had a thing for baking and started in middle school,” Phuong explained to me on a video call. Phuong, who works in pharmacy administration, found baking as a positive stress reliever on the weekends, especially with the added time spent at home given the pandemic. She took one of the first things she ever baked, cheesecakes, and found a way to add flavors that were familiar and comforting to her. “It hit me that I wanted to try durian and salted egg because of the trends in Asia. I hadn’t seen it around anywhere else,” Phuong said. Me neither — but I wouldn’t question the combination. The durian Basque cheesecake Phuong makes is creamy and indulgent while still maintaining durian’s signature aroma and custard-like flavor while the salted egg is freckled with orange yolks whose saltiness balances out the sweet.

“I literally thought if I posted, maybe one or two people would be interested,” Phoung said. That hasn’t been the case. Since posting, Phuong and her sister, Becky, have made and delivered over a dozen Basque cheesecakes each weekend. “I feel very supported by the [Facebook group]. It’s exceeded my expectations.”

Though the SGV Eats group is thriving, sharing food on Facebook doesn’t just occur in this small community East of Los Angeles. Over in the Gulfport and Biloxi area of Mississippi, Thuy Cherie Frederick handmakes Vietnamese egg rolls that she just recently began selling on Facebook. “During the pandemic, I realized there were different emotions going on all over the world and especially here on the coast,” Frederick told me via email. “I wanted something to comfort my coastie folks and I thought about how my egg rolls would be a good fit — especially with people not wanting to go out to eat at restaurants.”

At first, Frederick — who works at the Gulfport Memorial Hospital — was regulating her egg rolls to friends, family, and coworkers. But with encouragement from her husband and mother-in-law, she began selling her egg rolls online. “Making egg rolls is something I love to do in my spare time,” Frederick said. “I honestly do love cooking and always watch a lot of cooking shows on TV and Youtube.” In the future, Frederick hopes to broaden her menu but for now, she wants people in the greater Mississippi area to “venture out on different foods” starting with her egg rolls.

Yes, these online groups support home bakers and chefs, but they also happen to support a home farmer, too. In Kansas City, Missouri Jean Van Booven-Shook maintains a blackberry patch that she planted in 2008 and has been selling her fresh berries to restaurants since 2010. It’s a family affair: the patch is on her parents’ property and she gets her kids to help with the harvest during the season.

Due to the pandemic, restaurants aren’t buying nearly as much produce as usual and Van Booven-Shook found that the berries don’t fare well sitting out at farmers markets. It just so happens that COVID-19 hit during a year with such abundant crops — so she logged on to Facebook and created a page for her business, Eden Eatin’ Blackberries. “It is really nice to have people texting and messaging with inbound orders, rather than making outbound calls every day. It’s nerve-wracking with a perishable product like this,” she told me through email. “I was somewhat surprised how easy it has been to connect with everyone for delivery. With everyone being home more and texting, even my older customers, it has been surprisingly easy to connect with people for delivery at very short notice, as I am never quite sure how long my route will take.”  

Of course, as a first time seller, there are occasional hiccups. In the future, Van Booven-Shook wants to announce different areas of town she’ll be visiting to make deliveries more efficient and create larger minimums for orders. That being said, it’s a fun way for her to keep her family connected. “When we started it, we didn’t really think about an exit strategy. The patch keeps producing every year, and my parents love that I have to come out every day with my kids. So it is a family-bonding thing, and helping these kiddos develop a work ethic while earning some money.”

The running thread between all of these stories is the feeling of togetherness brought forth by sharing food and made easier thanks to an online platform. Whether in Los Angeles, Mississippi, or Missouri — and even in isolation — Facebook has given a space for those who want to connect through food. 

“It’s cool just seeing all of these cultures and communities come together, which is so exciting in all the upside downness of the world right now,” Velazco said. “It’s the one thing we can all come together and be like, ‘Let’s just eat. And chill. And vibe.’ It’s the one commonality we can all kind of come to right now.”

Sign up here for our daily Thrillist email, get Eatmail for more food coverage, and subscribe here for our YouTube channel to get your fix of the best in food/drink/fun.

Kat Thompson is a staff writer at Thrillist. Follow her on Twitter @katthompsonn
Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Plan a sweet getaway with Southern charm in Lake Charles, Louisiana – CultureMap Houston

The summer may be winding down, but that warm, carefree feeling is still lingering in Lake Charles, Louisiana. The sun’s rays are just as warm and inviting as ever, and this is your golden opportunity to sneak in a little relaxation before all the fall responsibilities start to crank up.

Lake Charles is a blend of contrasts, from the abundant wildlife and great outdoors to the stunning surroundings of casino resorts that come with a Cajun and Creole twist. You can literally explore nature in great abundance one day and fall into the lap of luxury the next.

Experience the convenience of two world-class casino resorts side by side: the Golden Nugget Lake Charles and L’Auberge Casino Resort. Both offer golf courses, spa facilities, restaurants, a variety of pools with lazy rivers, and award-winning chefs. You can also enjoy restaurants and horse racing at Delta Downs Racetrack Casino Hotel or melt into the islands at the Isle of Capri Casino Hotel.

If the outdoors is more your speed, you can reconnect with nature through the sights and sounds of the Creole Nature Trail All-American Road. Choose from birding, hiking, paddle boarding along the waterways, and shelling on the scenic Gulf beaches.

After a day on the lake, head downtown where unbeatable dining experiences and eclectic shops await, or check out the sites south of town with a stop at Crying Eagle Brewing Company to sip seasonal brews on tap. Nothing pairs better with a cold brew than the new, delicious menu choices at The Bistro at Crying Eagle.

Speaking of good eats: Jambalaya, gumbo, shrimp or crawfish étouffée, boudin, and bread pudding are just a few examples of Southwest Louisiana’s famous Cajun French and Creole cuisine. Luna Bar & Grill, Panorama Music House, and Rikenjaks are staples for scrumptious food and local music on the patio. Mama Reta’s is the place for soul food, while Famous Foods has an excellent selection for a good old-fashioned plate lunch, cracklins, or boudin.

One of the newest attractions in the Lake Area is Della Belle Bed & Breakfast. This enchanting property definitely adds a hint of magic to your getaway. Located right along the lake, Della Belle is a premier Shell Beach Drive mansion that’s been exquisitely renovated.

Spread across nine acres of scenic land, the Greek Revival main house is almost a century old and boasts five bedrooms, four full baths, and two half-baths. The luxury manor includes a grand parlor, garden parlor, billiard room bar, tearoom, pharmacy bar, formal dining room, and breakfast room. Also on the property are a delightful garden house, carriage house with an upstairs suite, and a boathouse that provides incredible panoramic views of the lake.

While you’re in Southwest Louisiana, soak up some culture by checking out the cultural exhibits on display at 1911 Historic City Hall Arts & Cultural Center. There are a variety of galleries to explore, including the Black Heritage Gallery. Or make plans to visit the Mardi Gras Museum inside Central School Arts & Humanities Center to explore rooms on costume-making, Mardi Gras Royalty, king cakes ,and more.

On the other side of the river is the Henning Cultural Center in Sulphur, along with the Brimstone Museum located next door and with The Grove Park nearby. It’s just right for a quick stroll through the gardens, complete with walking trails, flowers, and water features.

To gain more inspiration or to plan your trip, check out www.visitlakecharles.org.

Categories
Louisiana gumbo

9 Awesome Okra Recipes to Enjoy All Summer – Chowhound

easy chicken gumbo recipe

All featured products are curated independently by our editors. When you buy something through our retail links, we may receive a commission.

Okra is one of those vegetables you love or hate, and—we’d swear on a stack of our favorite cookbooks—any one of these okra recipes will put you squarely in the love camp.

When properly prepared, okra is subtly sweet and beautifully crisp-tender (though it’s also wonderful stewed to silky softness). While Americans are most familiar with it in Southern dishes like gumbo, it’s enjoyed elsewhere in the world as well. See Vietnamese sour soup (canh chua) or the Filipino vegetable dish pinakbet for some examples:

pinakbet Filipino vegetable stew

Chowhound

What Is Okra?

Okra is a fruit that most people treat as a vegetable (just like tomatoes, cucumbers, and peppers).

In its whole form, it looks like a long, green pod with a pointy end (which helps explain why they’re sometimes called lady’s fingers). Different varieties and colors of okra do exist, but they can all be prepared in the same ways—but note that “Chinese okra” is an entirely different plant similar to a summer squash, and is not interchangeable with the okra we’re talking about.

Cut okra into rounds and it reveals a honeycomb-like cross section with lots of white seeds inside:

While okra is packed with nutritional benefits, it’s probably most infamous for its slimy texture—but if that’s all you focus on, you’re selling it short (and probably cooking it incorrectly).

Okra may have originated in Ethiopia, West Africa, or South Asia, but we know it was brought to America by enslaved Africans; like so many other indigenous African ingredients, techniques, and dishes, it has became synonymous with Southern cooking.

It grows in various regions of Africa, as well as Pakistan, India, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, and the U.S. (in warm-climate states like Florida). Fresh okra is in season in summer in the U.S. and can be grown in gardens, but frozen okra can be found year-round.

What Makes Okra Slimy?

When you cut open an okra pod, it releases a thick, viscous, clear substance called mucilage. If you enjoy slippery textures, you might not mind. If you’d rather cut down on the slime factor, you can add a touch of vinegar, lemon juice, or acidic tomatoes to the okra, or quickly cook it over high heat:

Be sure to choose smaller pods at the store (or pick them early from your veggie garden), since they won’t be as slick.

How Should You Cook Okra?

There are many ways to prepare okra, from grilling and frying to stewing and searing, but you can also use it raw in pickles.

Okra Recipes

These are some of the best okra recipes around to demonstrate just how good it really is:

1. Grilled Okra

Grilled Okra recipe

Chowhound

Tossing fresh green okra pods onto a searing-hot grill pan (or an actual grill if its already been fired up) is the vegetable at its simple best. The okra ends up softened, a little blistered on the outside, and without any trace of sliminess—and it’s amazing with a Greek-inspired Yogurt Dipping Sauce featuring bright lemon, garlic, and basil. Get our Grilled Okra recipe.

2. Fried Okra

fried okra recipe

Chowhound

This is one of the simple pleasures of Southern cooking: sliced okra pods tossed in the simplest of cornmeal batters (with a little bite from freshly ground black pepper), fried quickly in properly hot oil. Popcorn shrimp has nothing on these morsels. Get our Fried Okra recipe.

Related Reading: A Beginner’s Guide to Deep-Frying Like a Pro

3. Shrimp and Okra Hushpuppies

shrimp and okra hushpuppies

Chowhound

Three defining foods of the South—shrimp, okra, and hushpuppies—have an old-fashioned family reunion in this recipe. Creole seasoning gives them proper Louisiana flavor, diced red pepper makes them look like a party, and a slug of beer in the batter gives them the right quality of lightness. Get our Shrimp and Okra Hushpuppies recipe.

4. Charred Okra with Bacon Jam

Charred Okra Bacon Jam recipe

Chowhound

Atlanta chef (and “Top Chef” alumnus) Kevin Gillespie came up with this deeply savory, beautifully seared, and subtly sweet mashup of okra and bacon, cooked in cast iron. Try it with fresh biscuits and/or eggs! Get our Charred Okra with Bacon Jam recipe.

5. Easy Chicken Gumbo

easy chicken gumbo recipe

Chowhound

Okra is a traditional ingredient in gumbo not just for its flavor but its thickening power; using frozen okra saves a ton of time, but if you have fresh okra, you can certainly use that here instead. Starting with a cooked rotisserie chicken still makes this quite possibly the fastest gumbo ever; it can go from ingredients to table in 40 minutes—no need to wait for Mardi Gras. Get our Easy Chicken Gumbo recipe. (And if you have more time on your hands, try our Chicken and Andouille Gumbo recipe, or Shrimp and Okra Gumbo recipe with tasso ham.)

6. Maque Choux

maque choux recipe

Chowhound

This traditional Louisiana dish of stewed corn, okra, and peppers is kind of the Cajun version of succotash. It’s a vibrant, versatile dish we start making when the first corn comes in, and don’t let go of until summer’s over. Get our Maque Choux recipe.

7. Citrus Jerk Bass with Fonio, Okra, and Tomatoes

JJ Johnson's Citrus Jerk Bass with Fonio, Okra, and Tomatoes

Beatriz da Costa

This dish from chef JJ Johnson features another underrated African ingredient: fonio, a super healthy, gluten-free grain similar in texture to couscous. It’s cooked with the okra and tomatoes and they all provide a flavorful base that soaks up the juices from the spicy, citrusy, jerk-seasoned bass on top. Get the Citrus Jerk Bass with Fonio, Okra, and Tomatoes recipe.

Related Reading: This West African Grain Bowl Is the Original Power Lunch

8. Quick Pickled Okra

quick pickles using leftover pickle juice

Chowhound

You can quick pickle just about any vegetable, and okra is no exception. Keep the pods whole and use small ones (no more than three inches long), which will be more tender and less fibrous. They’re ready to eat in one day, but even better after a week, and will keep for about a month in the fridge…if you don’t go through them all first. Get the Quick Pickled Okra recipe.

9. Stewed Okra and Tomatoes

Embracing okra’s soft side by stewing it is a time-honored tradition, and adding tomatoes is a classic move that helps control the slickness while making everything taste even more delicious. Get the Stewed Okra and Tomatoes recipe.

More from the Garden

5 Veggie Harvest Tips to Get the Most Out of Your Garden

Header image by Chowhound.

Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Walk-On’s Celebrates Grand Opening of First Odessa Restaurant – RestaurantNews.com

Walk-On's Celebrates Grand Opening of First Odessa Restaurant

Award-winning restaurant to give away free Walk-On’s for a year and more on Aug. 11

Walk-On's Celebrates Grand Opening of First Odessa RestaurantOdessa, TX  (RestaurantNews.comWalk-On’s Sports Bistreaux is bringing the Taste of Louisiana to Odessa on Tuesday, Aug. 11.

Located at 7820 E. Highway 191, Odessa’s first Walk-On’s will kick off its grand opening celebration with an official ribbon-cutting ceremony hosted by the Odessa Chamber of Commerce at 11 a.m. Guests should consider arriving early because the first 20 customers will receive a mini football autographed by New Orleans Saints superstar and Walk-On’s Co-Owner Drew Brees. To add to the excitement, guests can enter a drawing for the chance to win free Walk-On’s for a year! Walk-On’s Odessa will accept entries during its first full month of business and will announce the winner the week of Sept. 7.

“My brother Cade and I couldn’t be more excited to bring Walk-On’s to Odessa,” said Franchisee Josh Underwood. “The new restaurant is in a great location and we’ve hired an incredible All-American Team to join us in introducing this one-of-a-kind brand to everyone in the area. Walk-On’s signature Cajun cuisine served in a family-friendly atmosphere is unlike anything else in Odessa, so we know it’s going to be a hit. We look forward to becoming an integral part of the community and can’t wait to celebrate with everyone on Monday.”

Walk-On’s is renowned for its signature Louisiana-inspired menu served up in a game-day atmosphere by an All-American Team. When the new restaurant opens, it will be the 13th Walk-On’s in Texas and 43rd system-wide.

Odessa’s new Walk-On’s will be open Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to midnight. For more information about the new restaurant, visit facebook.com/walkonsodessa.

The safety and well-being of its guests and team members is and always will be a top priority for Walk-On’s. In addition to adhering to all federal, state and local guidelines, Walk-On’s has implemented enhanced sanitation standards and processes.

At Walk-On’s, each dish is made from scratch, using fresh ingredients to bring its mouthwatering, Cajun cuisine to life. The diverse menu features unique twists on game-day staples and upscale takes on Louisiana mainstays, such as Crawfish Etouffee, Duck & Andouille Gumbo and Krispy Kreme Donut Bread Pudding. For a complete menu, locations and more information, visit walk-ons.com.

Walk-On’s: Game Day With A Taste Of Louisiana.

About Walk-On’s Sports Bistreaux

Based in Baton Rouge, Walk-On’s Sports Bistreaux was founded in 2003 by Brandon Landry, a former walk-on basketball player at LSU. Leaning on the true spirit of a walk-on and building a winning culture, the brand is rapidly expanding across the United States. Its Louisiana-inspired menu features food and drinks made from scratch daily. Walk-On’s All-American Team serves up a game-day experience in a fun, family-friendly atmosphere that ensures every guest is a winner. For more information, visit walk-ons.com. To inquire about franchise opportunities, please visit walkons.com/franchising or contact Kelly Parker, director of franchise sales & real estate, at 225.330.4533.

Contact:
Brooke Sundermier
Champion Management
972-930-9933
bsundermier@championmgt.com

Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Link Gumbo 8/3/20 – Ultimatums Upon Ultimatums – And The Valley Shook

*Apologies that some of this news isn’t that fresh, but I’ve been compiling for a while. Gumbo’s always better on the 2nd day anyway.

As we barrel forward towards the college football season, and wonder if it will even take place, the decisions about if and how to play this year are all over the map, thanks in no small part to the utter lack of any decision making from the NCAA, who seem to prefer kicking the can down the road rather than take any blame for what happens.

Division 3 has almost completely shut down fall sports, and it only gets more fractured as you move up to D1 FBS.

As colleges wait on the NCAA, Sports Illustrated reports that even if the NCAA cancels the fall championships, some Power 5 conferences may decide to go on anyway, possibly kicking off the long rumored schism between the Power 5 and the NCAA.

As administrators continue to fret over how to justify playing football in a pandemic, the players, faced with the risks of contracting a disease that could damage their bodies irreparably, are not just sitting around and blindly trusting those in charge. Players from the SEC leaked recordings from a teleconference between players and conference administrators after being frustrated with their lack of good answers on a host of safety topics, including how players are supposed to keep themselves safe once thousands of other students return to campus.

Meanwhile on the west coast, a group of Pac 12 players have announced a planned boycott of the upcoming season, with a list of demands that range from preventing schools from forcing players to sign liability waivers that would waive all responsibility for COVID related player illnesses, to demanding a 50% revenue split of the Pac 12’s TV deal, and even a severe pay cut for P12 commissioner Larry Scott (because if there is one thing everyone in college football can agree on, it’s that Larry Scott is terrible.) The group includes many high profile P12 football players, including Oregon All-American offensive tackle Penei Sewell, and is said to be nearly 400 members strong.

What could come of all this is unknown, but after years of a growing call for more player compensation in college sports, the pandemic seems to have triggered a flash point in the fight between labor and management. A few weeks ago, the NCAA got dragged before congress to talk about the various player compensation laws gaining steam in statehouses across the country. Our friend Delly was there to watch people on both sides of the table make an ass of themselves.

LSU is starting to try out new full face helmet shields at practice. The early reviews are….not great.

The world of the pandemic has been very rough on the world of the sports broadcaster, from your SEC Network hosts down to local hometown guys like LSU Legend Lyn Rollins. SI interviewed many of them to find out how they’re surviving in a world without many sports to call.

Other P5 conferences and teams have been moving forward with their own plans, some of which give a glimpse into what may be coming to LSU this season. Michigan and Ohio St have announced reduced capacity plans and various safety and distancing measures like prohibiting on-campus tailgating.

Amid all that’s gone on, you may have missed the news that Vanderbilt has some very strange things going on. After hiring a new AD, Vandy quietly gutted their entire Athletics SID staff and is shuttering the department. Rivals has a detailed look at the moves which don’t seem to make much sense for a Power 5 athletic department.

On the bluffs of North Baton Rouge, the decision on football has already been made. Southern, and the rest of the SWAC are postponing all fall sports to the spring. In the case of the SWAC and other FCS leagues, the decision is easy. Their income is much more based on home game revenue than TV money, so it makes no sense for them to play when fans can’t come to games. Assuming the US can get back to normal this spring, it might be big boon for the SWAC, though not without other compromises. Southern AD Roman Banks told BR Proud that the reality of a spring football season may compromise other spring sports on campus, like baseball.

Interesting nugget out of Lake Charles: Frank Wilson, former LSU RB coach and recently fired from the UTSA HC job, thought about coming back to LSU before eventually taking the McNeese St HC job. He’ll be coaching Coach O’s son Cody this season.

After a playing career in the WNBA and around the world, LSU legend Temeka Johnson is back in Louisiana, now as the girls basketball coach at John Curtis.

If you’re trying to find a rooting interest in the MLB season (for however long it lasts) and the Astros somehow offend you, you might want to look into the Detroit Tigers, now with Zach Hess and a resurgent JaCoby Jones. It turns out there’s a bit of an LSU-Detroit pipeline building and it’s thanks to Detroit GM Al Avila, who got his first coaching job on Paul Mainieri’s staff at St. Thomas.

In other college baseball news, one of LSU Baseball’s all-time great rivals, USC and UC-Irvine coach Mike Gillespie has passed away. D1 Baseball.com details the career of one of the greats of the West Coast.

How about some regular old college football blog trolling? The SEC’s move to play no OOC games in 2020 means the breaking of many long standing rivalries. And Dawg Sports thinks the break from Georgia Tech should be permanent.

Roll Bama Roll recently celebrated an NCAA rule change that would have prevent certain aspects of Auburn’s 2019 Iron Bowl victory. College and Mag responded by making sure all those Bama fans were fully aware of all the other times Auburn has employed subterfuge to defeat Tha THAD.

I want to end on some good news and after scraping the bottom of the barrel, I found some. The construction project to add a protected left turn lane south of campus on Nicholson at Brightside will FINALLY be completed in the next few days.