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Louisiana gumbo

10 Best Country Singers from Louisiana – kpel965.com

There are certain states that are synonymous with country music. When you think of the genre, you naturally think of places like Tennessee and Texas.

Over the last few years, places like Oklahoma and Georgia have become a hotbed for producing some major country superstars.

As we know, in our great state of Louisiana, we’re a big ole gumbo pot full of great music — from Cajun to Zydeco, Jazz to Swamp Pop, we’ve got it all.

But let’s not forget that we do love us some country music here in “The Boot”. And when you get to thinking back and doing a little research, this state has produced some really strong country artists over the years.

It was a really tough task, but I do think this turned out to be a formidable “Top 10” list.

I do want to acknowledge a few artists that did not quite make the list, but are most deserving of cracking the top 10.

I left off current or recent artists such as Hunter Hayes, Dylan Scott, Andy Griggs and Jordan Davis.

And then there are some legends that had great careers that also deserve an honorable mention, including Jimmy C. Newman and Jerry Lee Lewis.

The latter was particularly tough to leave off the list. But due to the fact that he may fit more in the rock-n-roll category, we decided to leave him off.

At any rate, here they are, our list of the 10 best all-time country artists from Louisiana.

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Louisiana gumbo

Lives Lost: A Louisiana grandmother ‘took care of everyone’ – KATC Lafayette News

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Mary Louise Brown Morgan kept a garden full of rosebushes and just about every kind of fruit tree, from plums to satsuma oranges to kumquats. And when the lawn surrounding her south Louisiana home grew too high, the 78-year-old grandmother climbed on her lawnmower to cut it herself.

“She had the most beautiful yard on the block,” said her grandson, Steve Morgan.

Morgan, a “God-fearing woman” who made a “mean gumbo and red beans,” died on March 27, he said. She was the first in Terrebonne Parish to succumb to the coronavirus, in a state where COVID-19 is taking a heavy toll.

Born in New Orleans on Jan. 5, 1942, she was a lifelong resident of Gray, Louisiana — a small town of about 6,000 people, deep in the state’s Acadiana region.

Three times a week, she could be found working out at her local gym, where she enjoyed being with the Silver Slippers, a group of ladies who also would go out to lunch and have parties together, said her niece Penny Mikkel.

In addition to her gardening, she raised chickens, giving away eggs to friends and family. She was a regular churchgoer and frequent volunteer at Mt. Vernon Methodist Church, where she put up the Christmas tree and kept the pews clean.

Steve Morgan recalls his grandmother’s devotion to her faith.To her extended family, she was the matriarch who went out of her way to make sure they were OK. She helped care for a dying brother, a friend’s children, and before Steve’s sister Cecily died last fall, she traveled back and forth to Houston to visit her while she was being treated.

“My auntie had this beautiful spirit. …. She was very elegant and graceful and at the same time down to earth,” said Penny. “She was a treasure to our family. She kept everyone together.”

She also loved to travel, Steve said, recalling how she flew to New York to cook Thanksgiving dinner for him and his medical school colleagues.

In this image provided by Faye Morgan, Steve Morgan, left, and his grandmother Mary Louise Brown Morgan pose for a photo together. The 78-year-old grandmother died March 27, 2020, after being diagnosed with the new coronavirus. “Everybody loves her pies and cakes that she would bake,” he said.

She took care of the books for her late husband, who was a master plumber, and pushed her grandson to further his education. He eventually became a doctor in Cleveland, Ohio.

“It seemed like every graduation I had, she was there,” said Steve, whose wife is also a physician. “Everything we did, she would cut it out and put it into a frame and hang it in her house.”

When his grandmother called saying she wasn’t feeling well and asking him to come visit, he knew it was serious. She never asked for anything, he said.

Steve is acutely aware of the dangers of this coronavirus as an emergency department physician. He’s been treating infected patients in Cleveland. Still, watching his grandmother’s condition deteriorate so quickly was shocking: He arrived at the hospital in Houma on a Sunday evening, and she was intubated the next day. He never got a chance to talk with her face to face, and when she died, he couldn’t be at her side, instead looking into her room from the hallway outside.

Full Coverage: Lives Lost

“I was watching on the other side of the glass. That was rough. I think that was the hardest part,” he said.

A funeral service was held Thursday, April 2, but not inside her church. Instead, a small group of mourners — many wearing masks — stood at a distance and waved at each other, Penny said. Some day, when the coronavirus risk has lessened, they plan to have a proper memorial service.

“It’s a horrible disease,” her grandson said. “You can’t even gather together to remember her.”

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Louisiana gumbo

Louisiana Man Drives 19 Hours to Michigan with Supplies for Flood Victims – The Good News – wcrz.com

They even brought supplies to make homemade gumbo and jambalaya.

Dwayne Richard lives in Acadia Parish, Louisiana, which is just west of Baton Rouge. He survived 17 surgeries after a terrible fall; he always said that, if he could make it out of a wheelchair, he would give back to the community.

His family was helped by others when he was in the hospital; he said that they “lifted the burden” for them. Now, it’s his turn to help.

Dwayne’s Dream Team packed up over Memorial Day weekend and drove 19 hours to Sanford, Michigan after his wife had seen the flood devastation on the news.

They set up their visit with the United Way and brought clothes and furniture that were donated from their church, as well as supplies to cook for 500 people.

Dwayne told his local news station, KLFY that “We just felt the need to come here because they’re initial needs of clothing are now satisfied. Now when they get all their living arrangements settled, we will go ahead and give furniture to them.”

According to the Detroit Free Press, they served fresh, handmade gumbo and jambalaya outside the Red Oak Restaurant in Sanford – 15 gallons worth. After their stop in Michigan, they’ll head back south to help the survivors of a recent tornado.

Unreal – this guy and his “dream team” took their holiday weekend to drive for almost an entire day straight to help out people that they didn’t even know. Now THAT is the definition of “southern hospitality.” Thank you, dream team!

Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Homestyle podcast this week: How art can get you through quarantine and everything else – Daily Advertiser

Welcome to Homestyle, a podcast from The Daily Advertiser that’s all about life, family and the stories they inspire. Two best friends — Leigh Guidry and Joe Cunningham — host, sharing their hobbies and ideas for family fun even during quarantine.

The guest this week is our very own J.P. Fonte, a producer at The Advertiser and awesome painter on the side.

Episode 29: Art As An Outlet

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • where JP got his love of art and how it has been his outlet, something that’s coming in clutch during quarantine
  • what it’s like to pursue art as a hobby and how you can, too
  • the supplies you might want to grab to get started

Follow JP’s art journey on Instagram at @jp_fonte.

Find us on your favorite podcast app, or listen to the full episode below:

We want to hear from you! What hobby is getting you through quarantine?

Find us on Facebook and on Instagram (@Homestylepod). Leave us a review and be sure to rate our podcast on Apple Podcasts.

Catch up on more episodes of Homestyle below:

Episode 28: A Life of Art

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Acadiana artist Hannah Thibodeaux, better known as Hannah Gumbo in the art world, walks us through her art journey, from trying things as a kid, studying print-making and visual arts at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and now working as an artist full time
  • the different tools and tech she uses when creating
  • how COVID-19 has impacted her work and how she’s responding to changes
  • what’s next for the Louisiana-based artist
  • how art can be a lifestyle and therapeutic way to express yourself

Find more about her at her website hannahgumbo.com and on Instagram @allthatglittersisgumbo.

Episode 27: Maintaining A Healthy Lifestyle

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Mandy Armentor gives us ideas for healthy, simple meals we can make at home for the family;
  • shares LSU AgCenter resources for virtual recess, quarantine snacking tips and more;
  • gives tips about how to sneak veggies into meals for our picky eaters;
  • reminds us to get back to basics like the five food groups when it comes to cooking and meal planning;
  • and encourages us to give ourselves some grace during this time

Episode 26: Let’s Talk Distance Learning

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe talk about what they’re seeing in Louisiana and Acadiana schools and teachers do to provide learning opportunities
  • resources you can access online and for free (or very close to free) for your students
  • tips for how long to have students work each day — Don’t try to recreate a full day in a classroom on the computer, Joe says

Episode 25: Connecting Through Social Distancing

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • why it’s especially important to find ways to connect while maintaining distance
  • ideas like virtual happy hours, writing letters and phone calls
  • places you can go while still social distancing 
  • how to find an online community to connect with

Episode 24: Let’s Decorate Cookies

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Caitlin tells us how and why she got in to cookie decorating
  • her favorite techniques to try
  • how and why you can try while at home
  • the tools you’ll need to get started

Episode 23: What to Read in Your Downtime

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what Leigh and Joe are currently reading and their all-time favorites
  • why kids should be reading while schools are closed and how you can get them to do it
  • ways to incorporate reading into your day while in quarantine

Episode 22: In the Garden

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • how gardening can be a great outlet during this time of stay-at-home orders and COVID-19
  • tips from Joe for beginner gardenerers (i.e. Leigh)
  • a glimpse into Joe’s flower bed and roses
  • how to get kids involved in this project and keep them engaged

Episode 21: Capturing Memories with Photos

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Scott gives tops for organizing your photos and using them in your home;
  • he talks about the difference between photo art and photojournalism;
  • he provides some resources for printing photos for free or storing them.

Episode 20: Keep A Schedule During Quarantine

It’s week two of state mandates to close schools and work from home due to COVID-19, and between our two families we have three teachers and four kids. So this week we talk about the importance of finding and keeping a schedule for school and family activities.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Joe pull from his teaching experience to explain why it’s best to keep a schedule and routine while staying home for an extended time;
  • a few ideas for schedules, where to find more and how to tweak them to make it work for your family;
  • some activities to incorporate;
  • and advice to stay flexible.

Episode 19: Suddenly at Home for a Bit

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • a recipe to try out while you’re stuck at home;
  • a craft to get the kids involved and doing hands-on activities;
  • and ideas to keep from going stir crazy, from exercise to reading to educational programs.

Episode 18: Express Yourself

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • what having a creative outlet means to Leigh, Joe and Christa and what it does for Christa’s students
  • how she helps her students develop that writing skill and how you can, too
  • what you can do besides write to express yourself and get creative every day

Episode 17: What Lent Means to You

Mardi Gras is over, and we’re well into the Lenten season. So this week Leigh and Joe share what Lent means to them and what they like to eat. Joe helps out in that arena with some Lent-friendly recipes. 

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • how Joe makes an incredible crawfish cornbread (and how you can, too)
  • the practice of Lent in south Louisiana
  • ideas and different ways to observe the Lenten season

Episode 16: So Many Beads

It is finally Fat Tuesday, and you’ll be getting loaded down with beads, cups and other throws. Crafting is a fun, creative way to recycle all the things you’ve caught at the parades, so Leigh walks you through several ideas, from wreaths to headbands.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • how to create a wreath out of Mardi Gras beads and throws;
  • ways to decorate your table or garden with beads;
  • when you can use beads to celebrate other holidays.

Episode 15: The Struggle of the Juggle

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what juggling all the things looks like in Leigh’s and Joe’s lives (i.e. why they’re so tired at this point of basketball season)
  • how to find time to still do things you love that don’t make any money and why that matters
  • tips for winding down with family or asking for help when the struggle is too real

Episode 14: DIY Your Home and Save Energy

Joe and Leigh talk with Garrison Harrison, a conservation specialist with Lafayette Utilities System, about things people can do themselves to make sure they’re saving energy and saving money at home.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Garrison talk about the craziest things and biggest problems he’s seen providing “energy audits” at homes;
  • specific tips to put into place around the house to save energy and money;
  • and why Garrison chose this career.

For more about him and his job, visit lus.org or @lusutilities on Instagram. 

Episode 13: All Things Mardi Gras

We continue the Louisiana theme this week to discuss Mardi Gras with a special guest. Victoria Dodge is the features and culture reporter at The Daily Advertiser, but right now her unofficial title is Mardi Gras reporter.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what Victoria has been doing and learning as a non-Louisiana native experiencing her second Mardi Gras ever
  • Leigh and Joe throw in their experiences from north and south Louisiana
  • and some history of Lafayette Mardi Gras and the events you can find here this season

Episode 12: King Cake Season

It’s that great time of year (Epiphany) when we get to eat all the King Cake. Leigh and Joe already have had a few, so they share their favorites kind — more like a donut or cinnamon roll? Filled or not? Icing or sprinkles? Sweet or savory? So. Many. Choices.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe discuss the struggle of living in Louisiana during King Cake season and trying to keep New Year’s resolutions
  • their favorite kinds and places to get great King Cake
  • what a King Cake is (for those of you not in Louisiana) and its traditions
  • King Cake-flavored items you can try (Joe has strong feelings about this.)

Episode 11: Smokin’

Joe talks about smoking meat, something Leigh knows very little about so we all get to learn together!

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • which kinds of meat are best to smoke
  • different kinds of wood chips to use to impact flavor
  • ideas for rubs, marinades and sauces

Episode 10: Hosting Parties

Leigh and Joe — and special guest 7-year-old Elizabeth Cunningham — are talking about the favorite parties they’ve thrown and how they made it happen. From princess and Elmo birthday parties over the year to wedding showers this spring, they’ve got plenty of experience to share.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for choosing and carrying out a theme (without breaking the bank)
  • Leigh, Joe and Elizabeth’s favorite parties
  • destination party ideas
  • how to focus on the important part (having fun with friends and family) instead of on making the perfect party

Episode 9: Make the Most of the Weekend

Leigh and Joe are talking about activities families can do to together to make the most of the weekend.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Joe and family like to go to a bookstore like Barnes & Noble, which has story time for kids, coffee shop and lots to check out.
  • ideas for exploring your own town or the one you’re visiting (Joe loves grabbing a burger at Billy’s whenever he visits family in Natchitoches.)
  • Leigh and her family like road trips and getting outdoors. Maybe a day trip to a Louisiana state park or camping overnight.
  • ideas to make it a weekend at home. Encourage the kids to play with the toys they already have (you can hear the parent in us, can’t you?), do a craft or read a book.
  • tips for monitoring screen time for kids

Episode 8: Embracing a New Year

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • family traditions like camping as a way to start the new year calmly and around those you love;
  • traditional foods said to bring good luck and wealth in the new year;
  • a recipe for ham and beans to check pork (progress) and beans (wealth) off your list;
  • how to use make your own vision board;
  • how a “power word” can help you stay focused this year

Episode 7: Family Movie Night

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for at-home movie night food — like popcorn (obviously), a trail mix bar and banana cookies
  • light dinner ideas to make everyone happy and stay awake for the whole movie
  • the introduction of “grownup drinks” to movie theaters

Episode 6: Christmas Activities

It’s almost Christmas Day, so Joe and Leigh are talking about what to do during the holiday season.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for handling multiple Christmases in one day or one week
  • places you can go in Acadiana and across Louisiana to enjoy Christmas lights
  • how to get folks off their phones while home for the holidays
  • Leigh’s daughter Avery, 5, give some opinions in the background (sorry, not sorry)

Episode 5: Christmas Gifts

‘Tis the season for giving, so Joe and Leigh are talking about how they give during the holiday season. Sometimes it’s online or Black Friday shopping (yikes), or they have some ideas for how to make your own presents with a personal touch.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • gift ideas for those hard-to-buy-for folks in your circle
  • do-it-yourself options to personalize your giving
  • their favorite gifts as kids

Episode 4: Gumbo Time

It’s cool right now in Louisiana (at least some days), which means it’s gumbo time. In this episode you’ll hear:

  • a great gumbo recipe (Do you know the three-beer rule?)
  • Leigh and Joe’s many opinions about roux, potato salad and whether tomatoes belong in gumbo (Hint: they don’t)
  • their family gumbo traditions and favorite restaurant gumbos

Episode 3: Happy Thanksgiving

Our official launch episode is all about Thanksgiving, so Leigh and Joe talk about what their families do for their favorite holiday.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • recipe ideas for our favorite Thanksgiving pies — sweet potato and chocolate
  • craft ideas that you can modify for kids of different ages — painting with broccoli, anyone?
  • our family’s favorite activities — football and Taboo can get pretty competitive

Episode 2: Halloween

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe discuss their favorite childhood Halloween costumes;
  • DIY versus store-bought costumes,
  • how they trick-or-treat with their families;
  • and whether adults should dress up for the holiday

Episode 1: Tailgating

In the first episode, we discussed tailgating and gatherings to watch the big game — even if that’s at home in the air conditioning. (This is Louisiana after all.)

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • recipes for great tailgating food like chili (Are you pro-beans or anti-beans?), buffalo chicken dip and dessert;
  • tips for getting your house ready for the party;
  • and how to get the kids involved
Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Grab tasty Cajun at Seafood Seller and Cafe in Crystal River – ABC Action News

CRYSTAL RIVER, Fla. — Located inside a strip plaza in Crystal River, you will stumble upon a colorful, New Orleans-themed restaurant serving up tasty Cajun seafood.

Seafood Seller and Cafe offers a laid back experience with some of the freshest seafood on the Nature Coast.

We recommend the blue crab craws, seafood gumbo, sellers shrimp, Louisiana crawfish and so much more!

It’s the perfect spot for lunch or dinner with the family.

Seafood Seller and Cafe is located at 300 se, US-19, Crystal River.

Watch the video above for more. Click here for the full menu.

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Categories
Louisiana gumbo

AUDIOBOOKS: Harper Lee, the Midwest, and a culinary tour – theberkshireedge.com

This week we take an in-depth look at the book that was almost Harper Lee’s last effort, a look inside a Midwestern community, and a culinary tour through the land of gumbo. Please note that all audiobooks are available for download at independent bookstores and at your local library.

Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee
Casey Cep; read by Hillary Huber
Random House Audio, nine CDs, 11 hours and 30 minutes, $40/www.audible.com, $28

Harper Lee published to “Kill a Mockingbird” in her early 30s, and a “sequel” (really the first draft of “Mockingbird”) was published just before her death at 89. She produced little else. Monumental writer’s block constantly plagued Lee, but this investigation into her life reveals a murder case on which she worked for years and was supposedly writing about, though the project never came to fruition. Cep digs into the crimes Lee investigated much as Lee did when helping her friend, Truman Capote, unearth facts for “In Cold Blood.” The background to the murders flows into the account of Lee’s life, and each part is addictive for both the writing and Huber’s pleasing and professional narration, enhanced with regional accents. Grade: A

Virgil Wander
Leif Enger; read by MacLeod Andrews
Recorded Books, 10 hours and 37 minutes, $39.99/www.audible.com, $27.99

Virgil Wander, the owner of the local movie house, is recovering from a car accident that left him concussed. The residents of his small town of Greenstone, Minnesota, wander in and out of his life, bringing with them kindness, friendship and a low-key romance. Unfortunately, the plot eventually gets a bit clunky and doesn’t hold up as it unfolds. Andrews has a deep, attractive voice and speaks with a hint of Minnesota, though the accent comes and goes. That said, he comes across as emotionally authentic, which is a rare and lovely quality in a narrator. Grade: B-plus

Gumbo Life: Tales from the Roux Bayou
Ken Wells; read by P.J. Ochlan
HighBridge Audio, eight hours, seven CDs, $34.99/www.audible.com, $20.99

One would think a book about a spicy stew would have its limited attractions, but this is a surprisingly compelling listen. Journalist Wells talks about gumbo from a social, historical, cultural and personal perspective and he is never dull. You will hear of intriguing characters and interesting recipes, such as brandy- and foie gras-infused gumbo. There is a glossary of regional foods and a helpful guide to “South Louisiana’s Gumbo Belt.” Ochlan reads at a quick clip and easily manages regional pronunciations. The result is a mouth-watering, quirky and very concise study on an important local specialty. Grade: B-plus

Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Creativity in quarantine: Hannah Gumbo is the Cajun Lisa Frank – Daily Advertiser

The small town of Eunice is host to many things — rural Mardi Gras, the Cajun Music Hall of Fame, and Cajun Lisa Frank.

Hannah Thibodeaux, known as Hannah Gumbo, is a freelance artist and illustrator based in Eunice. Known for her bright, joyous illustrations, the creator is keeping this spirit alive during quarantine. 

“It’s been a combo of peaks and valleys,” she said. “In some ways, throwing my schedule and deadlines out the window was freeing … but the lack of human connection and constant inconsistency has also resulted in a lack of motivation, inspiration, and flow. I’ve tried to give myself grace and ride the waves of productivity and rest as they appear.”

Her current  artistic theme is “You are what you eat,” and everything she consumes is Cajun. The majority of what she produces reflects that, except for the frequent commissioned work.

Commissions include pieces like “The House That Lars Built” coloring book called “Imagining Hope,” where Thibodeaux pulled influence from quilts, creating a geometric pattern.  

She feeds her  creativity by traveling  and letting herself be heavily influenced by her surroundings. The 30-year-old is five states away from seeing all 50 states — missing out on Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Alaska and Hawaii. These road trips are full of memories, like picking flowers out of ditches, and provide plenty of project prompts. 

“They refuel and restock my pond of inspiration,” she said. “There’s something to be said about the unexpected.”

Thibodeaux grew up in the Broussard area where she was home schooled until high school. Both of her parents are creative people, allowing Hannah and her siblings to paint on their bedroom walls. Whenever her mom would bake bread, all three siblings would get their own handful of dough to experiment with.

“Creativity and resourcefulness was woven into my life early on,” she said.

Her childhood took her to a certain point of creativity. Thibodeaux didn’t sit down and try to draw still life portraits until she started high school at Comeaux. She was accepted into Arts Academy, a class outside of regular school that is similar to today’s Talented Program. There, she met Katy Reed who would become one of the most influential people in her young life.

Arts Academy had a big impact on Thibodeaux’s way of thinking, and with Reed came a blend of discipline and emotional process introduced into Thibodeaux’s art style.

More: Louisiana artist Hannah Gumbo talks a life of art on Homestyle podcast this week

In college, she was pushed to investigate uncomfortable topics and to pull inspiration from them. When she graduated, she realized there’s room for both angst and joy. Thibodeaux isn’t concerned with her art having a deeper meaning, the lighter side of life is what she’s interested in.

Her current process typically starts as a drawing, with paint added, and then to Photoshop. She will paint, Photoshop, and paint again. This creates a multidimensional piece of art that melds the two worlds of hand drawn and computer originated.

When she was younger, and even into college, Thibodeaux didn’t expect to get a job in a creative industry. During college, she was cleaning homes and watching kids for a living and she found she liked the connection those jobs offered. Once she graduated from University of Louisiana at Lafayette, she got married to “a Eunice boy” named Jordan and packed up, headed for the Cajun prairie where she has been for the past six years.

After graduating, she started working at a boarding school in Eunice. The odd hours afforded her free time during the day to create. Slowly, people started reaching out with small commissions. She started to take on different projects and created a pop-up shop  to sell bath bombs.

The art snowball began rolling when Thibodeaux created stickers for the bath bombs. Stickers morphed into wedding cards, then cardboard cutouts, and finally a mural in Eunice. 

Thibodeaux has been full-time freelance for three years now, saying its still as scary a decision as it was the first day. The self-described people person still hosts pop-ups, and teaches summer art classes and within the local school system to get her  social energy out. 

When she moved to Eunice, Thibodeaux didn’t know what to expect from the local art community. The simplified life has helped her take time with her art. At first, she was trying to keep up with monthly Artwalk expos, but found it stressful to carve out time to work on things that inspired her because there was too much to digest. 

So she took a step back and dug into her reservoir of ideas, asking “why do I create?”

“Visual art is a language,” she said. “I don’t always feel like I can articulate with words or have a specific path in life, but I surprise myself and connect with myself through art.”

Eunice is her cocoon. Making the drive home from Lafayette after meeting other artists is like taking a deep breathe of fresh air. She realized she needs time to sift through all the creative pieces she picks up while connecting with people and places. 

Recommended: Opelousas singer-songerwriter Emily Ortego releases first album

Creativity is a balance. Some days, Thibodeaux spends the sunny hours sending invoices and email. Other days, she carves out space to create art that will never see the light of day. When she feels she is proficient in painting and using text, she’ll go back to figure drawing and mixing up her mediums to keeps things fresh in her head. 

“I’m curious to see how things will change on the road,” she said. 

Although quarantine has halted all of her travel plans, Thibodeaux is spending time experimenting in her sketch book and not worrying about how it comes out. To maintain motivation, she started a “100 day project” where she draws well-known hair styles of fictional and real people, like Sharon Moss. 

In the, fingers crossed, soon future, Thibodeaux plans to extend her work outside of Louisiana, mixing travel with artwork. Things like road side attractions, or the weird and delightful are things she plans on seeing and pulling inspiration from. Her ultimate, die happy goal, is to design a stamp, an ode to her parents who both worked for the United States Postal Service. 

“If I can meet Sharon Moss in person, the sky is the limit,” she said. “Plus, how cool would it be to paint a little boudin on a stamp?”

Contact Victoria Dodge at vdodge@theadvertiser.com or on Twitter @Victoria_Dodge

Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Louisiana artist Hannah Gumbo talks a life of art on Homestyle podcast this week – Daily Advertiser

Welcome to Homestyle, a podcast from The Daily Advertiser that’s all about life, family and the stories they inspire. Two best friends — Leigh Guidry and Joe Cunningham — host, sharing their hobbies and ideas for family fun even during quarantine.

This week (week nine of quarantine) Leigh and Joe hopped on Zoom to virtually interview Acadiana artist Hannah Thibodeaux, better known as Hannah Gumbo in the art world, from her home in Eunice.

Episode 28: A Life of Art

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Hannah walks us through her art journey, from trying things as a kid, studying print-making and visual arts at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, and now working as an artist full time
  • the different tools and tech she uses when creating
  • how COVID-19 has impacted her work and how she’s responding to changes
  • what’s next for the Louisiana-based artist
  • how art can be a lifestyle and therapeutic way to express yourself

Find more about her at her website hannahgumbo.com and on Instagram @allthatglittersisgumbo.

Find us on your favorite podcast app, or listen to the full episode below:

We want to hear from you! Find us on Facebook and on Instagram (@Homestylepod). Leave us a review and be sure to rate our podcast on Apple Podcasts.

Catch up on more episodes of Homestyle below:

Episode 27: Maintaining A Healthy Lifestyle

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Mandy Armentor gives us ideas for healthy, simple meals we can make at home for the family;
  • shares LSU AgCenter resources for virtual recess, quarantine snacking tips and more;
  • gives tips about how to sneak veggies into meals for our picky eaters;
  • reminds us to get back to basics like the five food groups when it comes to cooking and meal planning;
  • and encourages us to give ourselves some grace during this time

Episode 26: Let’s Talk Distance Learning

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe talk about what they’re seeing in Louisiana and Acadiana schools and teachers do to provide learning opportunities
  • resources you can access online and for free (or very close to free) for your students
  • tips for how long to have students work each day — Don’t try to recreate a full day in a classroom on the computer, Joe says.

Episode 25: Connecting Through Social Distancing

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • why it’s especially important to find ways to connect while maintaining distance
  • ideas like virtual happy hours, writing letters and phone calls
  • places you can go while still social distancing 
  • how to find an online community to connect with

Episode 24: Let’s Decorate Cookies

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Caitlin tells us how and why she got in to cookie decorating
  • her favorite techniques to try
  • how and why you can try while at home
  • the tools you’ll need to get started

Episode 23: What to Read in Your Downtime

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what Leigh and Joe are currently reading and their all-time favorites
  • why kids should be reading while schools are closed and how you can get them to do it
  • ways to incorporate reading into your day while in quarantine

Episode 22: In the Garden

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • how gardening can be a great outlet during this time of stay-at-home orders and COVID-19
  • tips from Joe for beginner gardenerers (i.e. Leigh)
  • a glimpse into Joe’s flower bed and roses
  • how to get kids involved in this project and keep them engaged

Episode 21: Capturing Memories with Photos

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Scott gives tops for organizing your photos and using them in your home;
  • he talks about the difference between photo art and photojournalism;
  • he provides some resources for printing photos for free or storing them.

Episode 20: Keep A Schedule During Quarantine

It’s week two of state mandates to close schools and work from home due to COVID-19, and between our two families we have three teachers and four kids. So this week we talk about the importance of finding and keeping a schedule for school and family activities.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Joe pull from his teaching experience to explain why it’s best to keep a schedule and routine while staying home for an extended time;
  • a few ideas for schedules, where to find more and how to tweak them to make it work for your family;
  • some activities to incorporate;
  • and advice to stay flexible.

Episode 19: Suddenly at Home for a Bit

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • a recipe to try out while you’re stuck at home;
  • a craft to get the kids involved and doing hands-on activities;
  • and ideas to keep from going stir crazy, from exercise to reading to educational programs.

Episode 18: Express Yourself

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • what having a creative outlet means to Leigh, Joe and Christa and what it does for Christa’s students
  • how she helps her students develop that writing skill and how you can, too
  • what you can do besides write to express yourself and get creative every day

Episode 17: What Lent Means to You

Mardi Gras is over, and we’re well into the Lenten season. So this week Leigh and Joe share what Lent means to them and what they like to eat. Joe helps out in that arena with some Lent-friendly recipes. 

In this episode, you’ll hear:

  • how Joe makes an incredible crawfish cornbread (and how you can, too)
  • the practice of Lent in south Louisiana
  • ideas and different ways to observe the Lenten season

Episode 16: So Many Beads

It is finally Fat Tuesday, and you’ll be getting loaded down with beads, cups and other throws. Crafting is a fun, creative way to recycle all the things you’ve caught at the parades, so Leigh walks you through several ideas, from wreaths to headbands.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • how to create a wreath out of Mardi Gras beads and throws;
  • ways to decorate your table or garden with beads;
  • when you can use beads to celebrate other holidays.

Episode 15: The Struggle of the Juggle

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what juggling all the things looks like in Leigh’s and Joe’s lives (i.e. why they’re so tired at this point of basketball season)
  • how to find time to still do things you love that don’t make any money and why that matters
  • tips for winding down with family or asking for help when the struggle is too real

Episode 14: DIY Your Home and Save Energy

Joe and Leigh talk with Garrison Harrison, a conservation specialist with Lafayette Utilities System, about things people can do themselves to make sure they’re saving energy and saving money at home.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Garrison talk about the craziest things and biggest problems he’s seen providing “energy audits” at homes;
  • specific tips to put into place around the house to save energy and money;
  • and why Garrison chose this career.

For more about him and his job, visit lus.org or @lusutilities on Instagram. 

Episode 13: All Things Mardi Gras

We continue the Louisiana theme this week to discuss Mardi Gras with a special guest. Victoria Dodge is the features and culture reporter at The Daily Advertiser, but right now her unofficial title is Mardi Gras reporter.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • what Victoria has been doing and learning as a non-Louisiana native experiencing her second Mardi Gras ever
  • Leigh and Joe throw in their experiences from north and south Louisiana
  • and some history of Lafayette Mardi Gras and the events you can find here this season

Episode 12: King Cake Season

It’s that great time of year (Epiphany) when we get to eat all the King Cake. Leigh and Joe already have had a few, so they share their favorites kind — more like a donut or cinnamon roll? Filled or not? Icing or sprinkles? Sweet or savory? So. Many. Choices.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe discuss the struggle of living in Louisiana during King Cake season and trying to keep New Year’s resolutions
  • their favorite kinds and places to get great King Cake
  • what a King Cake is (for those of you not in Louisiana) and its traditions
  • King Cake-flavored items you can try (Joe has strong feelings about this.)

Episode 11: Smokin’

Joe talks about smoking meat, something Leigh knows very little about so we all get to learn together!

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • which kinds of meat are best to smoke
  • different kinds of wood chips to use to impact flavor
  • ideas for rubs, marinades and sauces

Episode 10: Hosting Parties

Leigh and Joe — and special guest 7-year-old Elizabeth Cunningham — are talking about the favorite parties they’ve thrown and how they made it happen. From princess and Elmo birthday parties over the year to wedding showers this spring, they’ve got plenty of experience to share.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for choosing and carrying out a theme (without breaking the bank)
  • Leigh, Joe and Elizabeth’s favorite parties
  • destination party ideas
  • how to focus on the important part (having fun with friends and family) instead of on making the perfect party

Episode 9: Make the Most of the Weekend

Leigh and Joe are talking about activities families can do to together to make the most of the weekend.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Joe and family like to go to a bookstore like Barnes & Noble, which has story time for kids, coffee shop and lots to check out.
  • ideas for exploring your own town or the one you’re visiting (Joe loves grabbing a burger at Billy’s whenever he visits family in Natchitoches.)
  • Leigh and her family like road trips and getting outdoors. Maybe a day trip to a Louisiana state park or camping overnight.
  • ideas to make it a weekend at home. Encourage the kids to play with the toys they already have (you can hear the parent in us, can’t you?), do a craft or read a book.
  • tips for monitoring screen time for kids

Episode 8: Embracing a New Year

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • family traditions like camping as a way to start the new year calmly and around those you love;
  • traditional foods said to bring good luck and wealth in the new year;
  • a recipe for ham and beans to check pork (progress) and beans (wealth) off your list;
  • how to use make your own vision board;
  • how a “power word” can help you stay focused this year

Episode 7: Family Movie Night

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for at-home movie night food — like popcorn (obviously), a trail mix bar and banana cookies
  • light dinner ideas to make everyone happy and stay awake for the whole movie
  • the introduction of “grownup drinks” to movie theaters

Episode 6: Christmas Activities

It’s almost Christmas Day, so Joe and Leigh are talking about what to do during the holiday season.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • ideas for handling multiple Christmases in one day or one week
  • places you can go in Acadiana and across Louisiana to enjoy Christmas lights
  • how to get folks off their phones while home for the holidays
  • Leigh’s daughter Avery, 5, give some opinions in the background (sorry, not sorry)

Episode 5: Christmas Gifts

‘Tis the season for giving, so Joe and Leigh are talking about how they give during the holiday season. Sometimes it’s online or Black Friday shopping (yikes), or they have some ideas for how to make your own presents with a personal touch.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • gift ideas for those hard-to-buy-for folks in your circle
  • do-it-yourself options to personalize your giving
  • their favorite gifts as kids

Episode 4: Gumbo Time

It’s cool right now in Louisiana (at least some days), which means it’s gumbo time. In this episode you’ll hear:

  • a great gumbo recipe (Do you know the three-beer rule?)
  • Leigh and Joe’s many opinions about roux, potato salad and whether tomatoes belong in gumbo (Hint: they don’t)
  • their family gumbo traditions and favorite restaurant gumbos

Episode 3: Happy Thanksgiving

Our official launch episode is all about Thanksgiving, so Leigh and Joe talk about what their families do for their favorite holiday.

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • recipe ideas for our favorite Thanksgiving pies — sweet potato and chocolate
  • craft ideas that you can modify for kids of different ages — painting with broccoli, anyone?
  • our family’s favorite activities — football and Taboo can get pretty competitive

Episode 2: Halloween

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • Leigh and Joe discuss their favorite childhood Halloween costumes;
  • DIY versus store-bought costumes,
  • how they trick-or-treat with their families;
  • and whether adults should dress up for the holiday

Episode 1: Tailgating

In the first episode, we discussed tailgating and gatherings to watch the big game — even if that’s at home in the air conditioning. (This is Louisiana after all.)

In this episode you’ll hear:

  • recipes for great tailgating food like chili (Are you pro-beans or anti-beans?), buffalo chicken dip and dessert;
  • tips for getting your house ready for the party;
  • and how to get the kids involved
Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Treebeards brings comfort food with Louisiana flare to Houston – WTVD-TV

HOUSTON, Texas — Treebeards opened in 1978 between a peep show arcade and a rowdy bar.

Now, more than 40 years later, the restaurant has become an icon in Houston, Texas.

The recipes have stayed the same for four decades, and there’s always a long line for the famous red beans and rice, gumbo, and jambalaya.

But Treebeards isn’t just known for its food! The restaurant has five locations, including one in the underground tunnels under downtown Houston.

Diners can also enjoy Treebeards at Christ Church Cathedral. The restaurant serves its mouth-watering food in the church’s social hall and courtyard.

Treebeards announced on May 17 that they would be closing the Market Square location on June 26, 2020 due to a spike in rent. But they will be opening a new location at Bunker Hill and I-10 in July.

Categories
Louisiana gumbo

Treebeards brings comfort food with Louisiana flare to Houston – KTRK-TV

HOUSTON, Texas — Treebeards opened in 1978 between a peep show arcade and a rowdy bar.

Now, more than 40 years later, the restaurant has become an icon in Houston, Texas.

The recipes have stayed the same for four decades, and there’s always a long line for the famous red beans and rice, gumbo, and jambalaya.

But Treebeards isn’t just known for its food! The restaurant has five locations, including one in the underground tunnels under downtown Houston.

Diners can also enjoy Treebeards at Christ Church Cathedral. The restaurant serves its mouth-watering food in the church’s social hall and courtyard.

Treebeards announced on May 17 that they would be closing the Market Square location on June 26, 2020 due to a spike in rent. But they will be opening a new location at Bunker Hill and I-10 in July.