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crawfish boil

The Kitchen Wild: Cooking Crustaceans – Newport News Times

Cooking up crustaceans is quickly becoming one of my very favorite go-to meals,but that doesn’t necessarily mean they all come from the ocean I’m talking about crawdads, too! 


An often overlooked activity on the Oregon coast, one that requires no fishing or shellfish license, is crawfishing. I hadn’t ever fished for crawdads until moving here to the coast but had heard that they were plentiful in the Alsea River just outside of my new hometown of Waldport.

So I asked around for advice on the best way to go about catching these little crustaceans, and the majority of people I asked told me to use cat food. I did, unfortunately with not much luck. Then my UPS driver, Aj, who was born and raised here in Waldport, suggested that I use bacon. This definitely worked a lot better than the cat food, but I love bacon a little too much to just throw it in the river. So on one of my last trips up the Alsea, I brought with me a piece of pork that unfortunately had started to go bad in my fridge before I had gotten the chance to use it, and it worked better than anything else so far!

Those little river lobsters came out in swarms to get that pork, so after several attempts, I think I’ve finally got the hang of this crawfishin’ thing, and I’m here to tell you it’s just as much fun as it is delicious.

My personal approach to crawfishing is to place a piece of raw (preferably a bit spoiled) pork securely under a rock so it doesn’t float away, but keeping just enough exposed that the crawfish can still get to it. Then you sit back and wait, but you won’t have to wait long because those little crawdads have a keen sense of smell and will begin to flock to that pork almost immediately. Be sure to have your net ready so you can scoop them right up when they do. Crawfish swim backwards, so carefully place your net right behind their tail, and they should swim directly into it. Be sure to have a bucket or cooler handy to keep those crawdads secure in after you’ve caught them.

The Oregon limit on crawdads, crawfish, crayfish, river lobsters or whatever else you might call these guys is 100, so that’s more than enough for a tasty meal.
On my way home from the river that day with my crawdads securely fastened in a bucket of water in the front seat of my car, I swung into Ray’s Food Place for some red potatoes, corn on the cob and kielbasa sausage to cook up with my crawfish, making it a full one pot meal.
That succulent crawfish paired with smoky kielbasa sausage, sweet yellow corn and red potatoes tossed in garlic butter with fresh parsley and a splash of Pelican Brewing Juicy India Pale Ale couldn’t have been a more perfect way to end an already incredible day.

There’s something so special about being able to harvest a meal like this with the ones you love, then sitting down at the end of the day and enjoying it together as a family. 



 

Crawfish Boil
Ingredients:


One limit of crawfish 


3 ears of corn on the cob cut into rounds (I used yellow but you could certainly use your favorite kind)


1 small bag of red potatoes 


2 packs of kielbasa sausage, sliced into rounds 


1 cup butter


6 cloves garlic, minced 


Handful of fresh Italian parsley, chopped 


1 cup of your favorite beer (I used Pelican Brewing Juicy India Pale Ale from Pacific City for this recipe) 


Coarse sea salt for topping 


 

Directions:
Pre boil your crawfish for approximately 5-10 minutes, until fully cooked. Set aside.


Boil your corn and potatoes until fully cooked, set aside.


Grill kielbasa until it has a nice char and warmed through, set aside. 


Place crawfish, corn, potatoes and sausage in a large pot or mixing bowl all together. 


In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter, then add garlic, stirring constantly to ensure garlic doesn’t burn. Once garlic is cooked through, add beer, stirring for approximately 1-2 minutes. Remove from heat, add fresh chopped parsley then pour over crawfish, potatoes, corn and kielbasa and carefully toss all together then dump it all out onto a large board, sheet pan, newspaper or whatever you might have handy, sprinkle with coarse sea salt and enjoy! 



 

Categories
crawfish boil

Kitchen Wild: Cooking crustaceans – Newport News Times

Cooking up crustaceans is quickly becoming one of my very favorite go-to meals, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they all come from the ocean — I’m talking about crawdads, too!

An often overlooked activity on the Oregon coast, one that requires no fishing or shellfish license, is crawfishing. I hadn’t ever fished for crawdads until moving here to the coast but had heard that they were plentiful in the Alsea River just outside of my new hometown of Waldport. 

So I asked around for advice on the best way to go about catching these little crustaceans, and the majority of people I asked told me to use cat food. I did, unfortunately with not much luck. Then my UPS driver, Aj, who was born and raised here in Waldport, suggested that I use bacon. This definitely worked a lot better than the cat food, but I love bacon a little too much to just throw it in the river. So on one of my last trips up the Alsea, I brought with me a piece of pork that unfortunately had started to go bad in my fridge before I had gotten the chance to use it, and it worked better than anything else so far! 

Those little river lobsters came out in swarms to get that pork, so after several attempts, I think I’ve finally got the hang of this crawfishin’ thing, and I’m here to tell you it’s just as much fun as it is delicious.

My personal approach to crawfishing is to place a piece of raw (preferably a bit spoiled) pork securely under a rock so it doesn’t float away, but keeping just enough exposed that the crawfish can still get to it. Then you sit back and wait, but you won’t have to wait long because those little crawdads have a keen sense of smell and will begin to flock to that pork almost immediately. Be sure to have your net ready so you can scoop them right up when they do. Crawfish swim backwards, so carefully place your net right behind their tail, and they should swim directly into it. Be sure to have a bucket or cooler handy to keep those crawdads secure in after you’ve caught them. 

The Oregon limit on crawdads, crawfish, crayfish, river lobsters or whatever else you might call these guys is 100, so that’s more than enough for a tasty meal.
On my way home from the river that day with my crawdads securely fastened in a bucket of water in the front seat of my car, I swung into Ray’s Food Place for some red potatoes, corn on the cob and kielbasa sausage to cook up with my crawfish, making it a full one pot meal.
That succulent crawfish paired with smoky kielbasa sausage, sweet yellow corn and red potatoes tossed in garlic butter with fresh parsley and a splash of Pelican Brewing Juicy India Pale Ale couldn’t have been a more perfect way to end an already incredible day. 

There’s something so special about being able to harvest a meal like this with the ones you love, then sitting down at the end of the day and enjoying it together as a family.

Crawfish Boil

Ingredients:

One limit of crawfish

3 ears of corn on the cob cut into rounds (I used yellow but you could certainly use your favorite kind)

1 small bag of red potatoes

2 packs of kielbasa sausage, sliced into rounds

1 cup butter

6 cloves garlic, minced

Handful of fresh Italian parsley, chopped

1 cup of your favorite beer (I used Pelican Brewing Juicy India Pale Ale from Pacific City for this recipe)

Coarse sea salt for topping

Directions:

Pre boil your crawfish for approximately 5-10 minutes, until fully cooked. Set aside.

Boil your corn and potatoes until fully cooked, set aside.

Grill kielbasa until it has a nice char and warmed through, set aside. 

Place crawfish, corn, potatoes and sausage in a large pot or mixing bowl all together.

In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter, then add garlic, stirring constantly to ensure garlic doesn’t burn. Once garlic is cooked through, add beer, stirring for approximately 1-2 minutes. Remove from heat, add fresh chopped parsley then pour over crawfish, potatoes, corn and kielbasa and carefully toss all together then dump it all out onto a large board, sheet pan, newspaper or whatever you might have handy, sprinkle with coarse sea salt and enjoy!

Categories
crawfish boil

Astros Crawfish Boil: August 13th, 2020 – The Crawfish Boxes

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crawfish boil

Astros Crawfish Boil: August 12th, 2020 – The Crawfish Boxes

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crawfish boil

Astros Crawfish Boil: August 11th, 2020 – The Crawfish Boxes

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crawfish boil

Spots remain open in Triple B Invitational; new auction items available – nsudemons.com

By: Jason Pugh, Assistant AD for Media Relations

NATCHITOCHES – Spots for both individual golfers and teams remain available for Saturday’s Triple B (Boudin, Birdies and Brad Laird) Invitational at Northwestern Hills Golf Course.
 
The fundraising tournament for the Demon football team remains set for a 1 p.m. start that Saturday. Registration begins at 12 p.m. for each four-person team. COVID-19 safeguards will be in place and participants are encouraged to wear a mask and practice social distancing until they begin playing the course.
 
The first scrimmage of fall camp, originally scheduled for Saturday morning, has been canceled and remaining practices are closed to the public because of the coronavirus pandemic.
 
For those who are unable to make it to the tournament, the online auction supporting the NSU football team has seen its available items balloon in the past couple of weeks.
 
All proceeds from the tournament and auction benefit the Northwestern State football program.
 
Headlining the available memorabilia and myriad hunting and beach vacation trips, signed footballs by Super Bowl LIV Most Valuable Player and 2019 NFL MVP Patrick Mahomes and 1987 Heisman Trophy winner Tim Brown, canvas prints of Turpin Stadium, a crawfish boil with coach Brad Laird, a “Demon For a Day” experience as well as a VIP package that includes luxury box seating for four at Turpin Stadium, four courtside seats to an NSU basketball game at Turpin Stadium and four luxury box seats for a Demon baseball game at Brown-Stroud Field during the 2020-21 athletic year.
 
To see and bid on all available auction items, visit www.NSUDemons.com/footballauction.   
 
Entry fees for the golf tournament include the Hall of Fame ($1,000 hole sponsorship and a four-man team), All-American ($450 four-man team and a tee box sign) All-Conference ($400 four-man team), Scholarship Player ($125 single-person entry) and Walk-On ($100 tee box sign).

For more information on the tournament, visit www.NSUDemons.com/TripleB.  
 
To sign up or for further information on the tournament or auction, contact assistant coach J Pond at pondj@nsula.edu or by phone at 979-777-6744.
 

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crawfish boil

Astros Crawfish Boil: August 10th, 2020 – The Crawfish Boxes

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crawfish boil

Want a seafood boil to go? This popular Phoenix restaurant is back for a weekend pop-up – AZCentral

FIRST BITE: Phoenix chef goes from jobless to instant soul food success

A finger-lickin’ seafood boil may look a little different during a pandemic, but fortunately you can still create that experience at home in all its messy glory.

Little Cleo’s Seafood Legend returns for another pop-up event Aug. 15-16 at The Yard in uptown Phoenix, The Sam Fox restaurant closed in May 2018 and was known for its oyster bar, grilled fish and absinthe happy hour.

Fans got to relive some of their memories on April 25 when the seafood restaurant was resurrected for a Cajun shrimp boil, take-away style. Now Little Cleo’s is back for round two, this time with to-go cocktails.

“With everything going on, we’re hoping to bring a little fun to your home with a checkered tablecloth, bibs and messy great food,” Fox said in a statement in April.

How to order from Little Cleo’s

Online pre-ordering begins Aug. 8 and closes Aug. 14 at 5 p.m. at littlecleos.com.

The $75 Cajun Shrimp Boil, which feeds between four to six people, includes:

  • Peeled shrimp (2 lbs).
  • Corn on the cob.
  • Red potato.
  • Andouille sausage.
  • Jalapeño corn bread.
  • Jambalaya rice.
  • New Orleans-style bread pudding with bourbon raisin sauce.
  • Sweet tea.

Customers can also add a pound of King crab for $40. Meals are served cold with reheating instructions, lemons, bibs and a checkered table cloth.

To-go drinks include:

  • Two-for-one cocktails: Old Fashioned, margarita, sangria and Louisiana Lemonade ($12).
  • 6-pack of Abita “Purple Haze” ($12).
  • 4-pack of Two Chicks “Sparkling Paloma” ($18).
  • 4-pack of Mamitas Tequila and Soda “Mango” ($18).
  • Bottle of Rosé, Sauvignon Blanc or Pinot Noir (various prices).

Customers can pick their food up between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. on their selected date at The Yard, located in Phoenix at 5632 N. 7th St.

Here are other to-go seafood boil options

Can’t make the dates for Little Cleo’s? There are plenty of other seafood boils around town that are open for pickup, some with delivery and online ordering options. Hours are subject to change during the pandemic, so call ahead.

Angry Crab Shack: Locations in Mesa, Phoenix, Goodyear, Peoria and Surprise. angrycrabshack.com.

Hint of Soul: Seafood boil available Saturdays only. 1900 E. Fifth St., Tempe. 480-712-2580, hintofsoulcatering.com.

Hot N Juicy Crawfish: Locations in Glendale and Tempe. Scottsdale location temporarily closed. hotnjuicycrawfish.com.

LA Crabshack: 1948 W. Broadway Rd., Mesa. 480-659-7922, thelacrabshack.com.

Mr Claws: 1130 W. Grove Ave., No. 111, Mesa. 480-955-1883, mr-claws.business.site.

Reach the reporter at Priscilla.Totiya@azcentral.com. Follow @priscillatotiya on Twitter and Instagram.

Subscribe to azcentral.com today to support local journalism.

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crawfish boil

Astros Crawfish Boil: August 7th, 2020 – The Crawfish Boxes

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crawfish boil

Downtown Chinese restaurant reopens, adds Cajun food to menu – IndyStar

If you’re hungry and can’t decide between the old standby of Chinese food and the increasingly popular seafood boil, there’s a spot that might be up your alley.

China King in downtown Indianapolis reopened this week with a new look and a new menu, devoting half of its offerings to Cajun seafood.

China King, which has been operating at 148 N. Delaware since 1992, found the disruption of the pandemic and unrest in downtown Indianapolis to be an opportunity to shake up business for the better, said manager Anita Li.

 The restaurant had been closed since March 21 and had planned to reopen in June. Then vandals destroyed the storefront window.

“We never had the time to close down and fix anything. We thought that since other offices haven’t come back to work yet, it’s going to be slow anyway; so while waiting for the window to be fixed then we thought we’d just do some work inside,” Li said. “This restaurant has been here for 20 years and has never changed.”

The family-owned business updated with new wood paneling and LED  menu boards.

“We added seafood boil to our menu to draw more people and this gives them more choice,” she said.

Popular items such as General Tso’s chicken, fried rice, and beef with broccoli are still on the menu, but new are the boils with shrimp, snow crab legs, mussels, squid, lobster tail, clams and crawfish.

There’s plenty of fried stuff too, including shrimp, tilapia, catfish and oyster baskets with Cajun fries and hush puppies, cheese sticks, onion rings, calamari, scallops and chicken wings.

China King culled the 100-item Chinese food menu, getting rid of dishes like moo shu for which demand was low, and those like egg foo young that took too long to prepare. It also eliminated soup offerings because there was no room for the equipment used to keep it warm. Li said a couple of soups might return to the menu in the winter.

Of course, many customers aren’t limiting themselves to one cuisine when visiting, and are pulling from both sides of the menu, she said.

Regular Fernell Hill was quick to try the new shrimp boil while adding one of her favorites, shrimp fried rice, to her order.

“I was excited about this when I drove past and saw the sign saying they had a new seafood menu,” she said.  “I love the idea.”

China King reopened as carryout and delivery only for now.

Contact IndyStar reporter Cheryl V. Jackson at cheryl.jackson@indystar.com or 317-444-6264. Follow her on Twitter: @cherylvjackson.